Not happy in your current job? Having a hard time finding your soul mate? The design of your home could be the problem, if followers of the ancient Chinese art of feng shui are to be believed.

Not happy in your current job? Having a hard time finding your soul mate? The design of your home could be the problem, if followers of the ancient Chinese art of feng shui are to be believed.

Developed over 3,000 years ago and still in use today, feng shui (pronounced "fung shway") is defined by WorldBookOnline.com as the art of placement: "The goal of feng shui is to create a sense of balance and harmony in an environment."

According to feng shui, life-force energy called "chi" flows from both living and inanimate objects. A cluttered or badly arranged environment may corrupt chi, making it destructive. A properly arranged environment allows chi to flow creatively and improve the inhabitant's health, happiness and professional life.

Although many westerners believe feng shui relates only to interior design, it can also be used to determine the location and construction of a building. In fact, in Chinese culture feng shui is taken so seriously that the construction of new buildings and alterations to existing ones are often undertaken only after a feng shui expert has been consulted, and correcting unfavorable feng shui is considered a healing process.

Feng shui may involve an action as simple as moving a piece of furniture that has misdirected chi in a room. Good chi may also be released by changing wall color or adding a mirror, fish tank or potted plant to a room.

Learn more about feng shui and how you can transform your home using its basic tenets. Connie Spruill, co-director of the Feng Shui Institute of America, will offer hints, tips and new ideas on Wednesday, Oct. 7, at Northwest Library, 2280 Hard Road.

Her program will start at 7 p.m.

Spruill is also author of the book, "Feng Shui with What You Have," which offers readers ways to create a harmonious environment that works with their living space and reflects their personality, taste and cultural background.

Hillary Kline