D.J. Falcoski believes his background in construction and development combined with his passion for the community make him an ideal candidate for Worthington City Council.

D.J. Falcoski believes his background in construction and development combined with his passion for the community make him an ideal candidate for Worthington City Council.

Falcoski, 41, first visited Worthington in 1994, when he moved to central Ohio to work for Turner Construction as a cost engineer.

He was immediately sold on Worthington, and made it a goal to live here someday.

"I could live anywhere in the world, but I knew within 60 seconds of being here that this is where I wanted to live," he said. "I could just feel it."

First though, he purchased and renovated homes in German Village and Clintonville, then bought and extensively renovated a historic home on Olentangy River Road in Worthington in 2004. He and his wife, Christina Corl, live there today.

He grew up in Solon, Ohio, working in construction even as a youngster. He graduated with a B.A. from Bowling Green University in 1991, and has worked in construction and development since. He also attended Kent State University and Ohio State University, where he finished the prerequisites for the MBA program.

He is currently corporate business director for Northwest Title. He was previously development manager for National Realty.

He is also a member of the Worthington Board of Zoning Appeals, which means he has sat on both sides of the table in Worthington zoning matters.

In 2006, Falcoski was the developer of Simsbury Place, the three-story brick condominium building at 835 Proprietors Road. The process of getting the city's permission to build on the former Worthington Foods parking lot site took many months, meetings and discussions before various boards and commissions and city council.

Falcoski finished and marketed the building, but it never sold. Earlier this year, he forfeited the project to the bank.

It was particularly difficult to lose a project in his own backyard, he said, but the timing was just wrong.

"A lot of smart developers didn't see the downturn coming," he said.

The experience left him with a perspective that would be valuable on council, he said.

"Worthington does not have a reputation of being developer friendly," he said.

Some people say the city does not need a full-time economic development director because it has so little land to develop. Falcoski said that is the reason it does need to create the position.

"We have more competition now than ever," he said. "We can't rely on our name anymore."

Falcoski's house is very near the Ohio State University Airport, so he is aware of the noise generated by Don Scott Field. He said he has no problem with the airport as it is and has been, but does not want to see the extension of the north runway, which is projected to increase jet noise over the city.

"It's going to be loud," he said.

Besides being a member of BZA, Falcoski belongs to the Worthington Historical Society, and is a member of the executive council of the Columbus Chapter of the American Diabetes Association, and sits on the board of directors of Step by Step in Worthington.

He has gotten involved in local organizations because he hopes to live here for a long time, he said

"It took me two stops to get here, and I got here," he said. "And I'm not going anywhere."

D.J.

Falcoski