An educator whose quiet leadership and innovative ideas helped shape the curriculum of the Worthington schools was remembered in a ceremony at Thomas Worthington High School last Sunday afternoon.

An educator whose quiet leadership and innovative ideas helped shape the curriculum of the Worthington schools was remembered in a ceremony at Thomas Worthington High School last Sunday afternoon.

Approximately 100 residents gathered for the unveiling of a plaque honoring Earl W. "Bill" Lane.

The plaque is mounted on a rock outside the west door of the high school, where Lane once served as principal.

He joined the district as a teacher in 1952, and retired as assistant superintendent in 1981.

Lane was a leader in developing the modern middle school as well as making changes at the high school. He was also instrumental in developing Worthington's award-winning high school alternative program at Linworth.

Charlie Warner remembered Lane as an extraordinary educator; a warm, friendly, inclusive man with an incredible sense of humor and a twinkle in his eye.

"He left an indelible, incalculable impression on Worthington High School," Warner said.

Though he could not attend on Sunday, former Superintendent John Hoeffler's words were shared. He said that Lane shaped the Worthington schools more than most people knew.

He was always there to help, encourage, and inspire, Hoeffler wrote, recalling him as a "perfect gentleman who treated all with a sense of dignity."

Current Superintendent Melissa Conrath said Lane helped create one of the best school districts in the country.

"It is people like Bill whose legacy will live on for years, who make the Worthington school district what it is today," she said.

The plaque says, in part: "Earl W. 'Bill' Lane, a quiet leader, was instrumental in creating Worthington's excellent public school curriculum and guiding the Worthington Schools to national prominence."

Lane's daughter, Jennifer Lane Maier, spoke about her father. Grandchildren Jessie and Will Maier unveiled and accepted the plaque on behalf of the family.

Lane died last year, and friends formed a committee to create a memorial. Besides raising money for the plaque, they also raised more than $12,000 which was donated to the Worthington Education Foundation (WEF). It will be used for grants for special projects in the schools.

"His legacy will continue to live on and have a direct impact on our students," said Geoffrey Scott, representing the WEF.