In response to the recent crimes in Worthington Estates, neighbors are forming a communications network to keep them in touch with each other and with the city and police.

In response to the recent crimes in Worthington Estates, neighbors are forming a communications network to keep them in touch with each other and with the city and police.

Estates resident Jennifer Silliman last week sent letters to neighbors. She asked them to share their concerns and to either volunteer to become a block coordinator or to share contact information to become part of the network.

Based on neighborhood/block watch programs, the plan is designed to forge bonds among residents, help reduce burglaries and robberies, and strengthen relations between police and community members.

The plan will not encourage neighborhood patrols or watch duties, but will encourage residents to become the eyes and ears for reporting crime and helping neighbors.

"The ultimate goal is a stronger neighborhood," the letter from Silliman states.

The online questionnaire asks for names of household contacts, address, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses, and how the information may be shared.

Respondents are also asked to share their top safety concerns, other issues they would like to see addressed, and for other comments.

Once block coordinators are identified, they will distribute paper questionnaires to residents who do not have access to the Internet or an email address.

Officer Tammy Floyd, the police department's community services officer, will set up an initial block watch meeting as serve as a resource to educate residents on safety and crime prevention.

Silliman can be reached at worthingtonestatesnetwork@gmail.com.