Mischievous, hard-working and kind are words often used to describe Penny Call, who died Aug. 26 after a seven-year battle with breast cancer.

Mischievous, hard-working and kind are words often used to describe Penny Call, who died Aug. 26 after a seven-year battle with breast cancer.

Call was a longtime Worthington resident and well-respected real estate broker, who worked most recently for Cam Taylor Realtors.

Call continued to sell houses until recently. She showed a house 10 days before her death and sold one two weeks earlier, friends said.

"She was one of those brokers who sets an example for others," said Gary Parsons of Cam Taylor. "She was warm and friendly, but feisty at times."

Most people knew Call by her sense of humor, said Linda Beegle, who had been her best friend for nearly 40 years.

Friends were invited to attend calling hours on Wednesday, Aug. 31, to share "Penny stories," according to the obituary in The Columbus Dispatch.

One of Beegle's favorites involves Call coming to visit at the Beegle's vacation home in Arizona.

Call slept in a guest room decorated with bunnies, including bunny-shaped finials on the white iron bed. One of them always was in her way when she tried to watch television in bed, she said.

One day, Call came into the house with a hacksaw. She told Beegle she had planned to use it to get rid of that bunny.

Most people knew her sense of humor, but fewer knew the part of Call that took care of others in need. Over the years, people who lost their homes were taken into hers. She also paid for tutors for the disabled son of a woman who did her nails.

"She was a good person, and she was so funny," Beegle said.

Most people also don't realize that Call grew up in the Pittsburgh area, where she was a high-society debutante. Her father was the headmaster at the prestigious Sewickley Academy.

She lived for many years in the village of Riverlea, where she raised her two children and served for eight years on the village council.

She also was active in the Worthington Women's Club and Worthington Historical Society. Several years ago, she opened her Old Worthington condominium at Christmastime to share her extensive collection of Santas.

She and Beegle shared that hobby.

"She was a many-faceted person," Beegle said.

Last New Year's, while suffering from four broken bones that were a result of cancer that had spread, Call ignored doctors' advice and got on a plane to visit a sister in Florida.

"She said, 'I'm going,'" Beegle recalled. "She was the strongest person I knew."

Call is survived by her son, Chris (Katy) Call; daughter, Bobby (Derrin) Ritchie; four grandchildren, Alex, Grace, Alivia and Sofia; and a sister, sister-in-law and nieces and nephews.

Contributions may be made to Penny's Memorial Fund at any local Huntington Bank branch. Money will be used for future charitable donations.