As your paper publishes back-to-school start times, I want to remind Worthington parents and residents of the stories you reported in June regarding the employees of Worthington City Schools agreeing to wage freezes.

As your paper publishes back-to-school start times, I want to remind Worthington parents and residents of the stories you reported in June regarding the employees of Worthington City Schools agreeing to wage freezes.

Since the new contracts were ratified and approved by the board of education in early summer, many Worthington parents and families may not be aware of the commitment that the school administrators, teachers and workers made to the Worthington community.

Administrators agreed to a wage freeze for the next two years. Worthington teachers, 750 professionals, agreed to freeze salaries and step increases over the next three years. Also, 450 classified Worthington workers, bus drivers, cafeteria staff, secretaries, janitors and maintenance staff agreed to a pay freeze with no step increases.

In this economy, this is a sacrifice. Step increases for Worthington classified workers range from 30 cents to $1.30 an hour. Classified positions are not high-wage to begin with and yet the classified workers in the district agreed to a pay freeze.

For all the talk about the average teachers' salary in Worthington being about $75,000 a year, both my son's first-grade teacher and my middle school daughter's algebra teacher made less than $45,000 each last year. Both were exceptional at their job and definitely worthy of an increase.

In addition, both of my children's teachers live less than a mile away from my home. They work, live and pay taxes in Worthington and they are an integral part of our community.

Last school year, I heard Superintendent Melissa Conrath, on several occasions, tell parents and the community that in order to continue Worthington schools' standard of excellence, it was going to take sacrifice in reductions from the administration, sacrifice in contract negotiations with the teachers union and sacrifice from the community in the form of a future levy/bond issue.

Reductions in state school funding, the loss of the tangible tax revenue to the district and declining property values are among factors that created the need for sacrifice.

In the upcoming year, with the possibility of a levy/bond issue on the November 2012 ballot, I hope Worthington parents and residents will be willing to share the sacrifice in supporting our students' educations.

I am thankful for the sacrifice that school employees agreed to over the summer, I am thankful that my children will be returning to Worthington Schools this week and I am thankful that I am a member of a community that supports excellence in education.

I would like to thank Jack Moss for his 15 years of service to Sharon Township residents as one of our trustees.

I have had the pleasure of working with him on safety issues and the development of our neighborhood Block Watch. After all his years of service as an educator, coach, and a small business owner, a Jack Moss story is always sure to enlighten.

Our community has been very fortunate to have a public servant who has devoted such care and attention to his constituents' issues and concerns.

He put in hard work acquiring our new township headquarters. Because of his efforts, the building will serve our community for many years to come.

Good luck, Jack, with your future endeavors, and my best regards to you and your family.