Thank you, Worthington. Your positive vote on annexation has strengthened our sense of being part of the Worthington community and confirmed the strong bonds that exist among the residents of our two towns.

Thank you, Worthington. Your positive vote on annexation has strengthened our sense of being part of the Worthington community and confirmed the strong bonds that exist among the residents of our two towns.

Riverlea is a 72-year experiment in democracy and limited government, and our residents have asked us to continue that experiment. But we fully understand that our participation in the community life of Worthington enriches us immeasurably. We receive outstanding service from your police and fire departments. Our children are classmates. We live, work and worship in Worthington and feel so much a part of it. We thrive because of the wonderful city that surrounds us.

Our futures will be shared. Thank you for inviting us to do that formally. We look forward to seeing all of our Worthington friends soon, particularly as we share your beautifully decorated downtown these holidays.

Please, not another bank. No offense, Insight Bank, but I think we already have about 10 banks within a two-mile stretch along High Street in Worthington.

Worthington City Council pledged or is providing $75,000 for Insight to remodel the old and vacant Daltís restaurant for 25 employees, where we can expect to collect about $55,000 a year in income taxes, assuming they donít leave, downsize or go out of business.

Why doesnít Worthington try to bring in businesses that the community can use? Or maybe an attraction that would entice all those sitting in traffic going north on U.S. Route 23 to head south for an hour or two after work? The United Methodist Childrenís home location is going up for sale, and I am sure the city will have some incentives tied to the suitor. How about we donít provide incentives for 100 percent office space or a bank?

Here are a couple ideas: How about a Whole Foods or a Lucky Strike Lanes? Hereís some math on Whole Foods: the average store does more than $30 million a year in sales and employs more than 150 full-time workers. Sure, most of their sales is non-taxed food, but go to the Dublin location any given night and see how packed it is for those eating there. And I donít think this would take away from our restaurants in downtown Worthington.