It was only two hours into Precycle Day, and already most of the items on Karen Reiner's curb were gone.

It was only two hours into Precycle Day, and already most of the items on Karen Reiner's curb were gone.

Someone took the exercise bike and the dart board; the baskets had been picked over; and the herb pot and garden gloves had just gone to a new owner.

The Fisher stereo system, in its original six boxes, was still neatly stacked near the street on Blandings Court, but Reiner was confident it would be claimed soon.

As far as she was concerned, the 2012 Precycle Day was a huge success.

"It couldn't get any better than getting stuff out of my basement and keeping it out of the landfill," she said.

That is the purpose of Precycle Day, said Fred Yaegar, a founding member of Sustainable Worthington.

He was the originator of the event, which began three years ago. Beginning at 6 p.m. April 18 and going on for about 24 hours, the event allows residents to get rid of still-usable but unwanted items.

They simply place their "stuff" along the curb, where it could be picked up by someone who wants it. No money changes hands; the environment benefits; and neighbors get together to watch it all.

"We're having a great time," Reiner said on April 18.

Clintonville resident Heather Irvin Hauser had just been by. She left with a plastic storage tub and a DustBuster. With a friend, she was enjoying driving the streets, hunting for bargains.

"We love Precycle Day," she said.

Not as many residents set out their unwanted "stuff" this year as in the past, Yaeger said.

"But everything got taken," he said.

He and the Precycle Day committee will meet soon to decide how to proceed in coming years. The household-to-household event could be modified or remain as is, he said.

In 2011, Precycle Day received an Emerald Award from the Solid Waste Authority of Central Ohio (SWACO).