A sewer that washed out a road and another that caused a neighborhood stink got immediate attention from Worthington City Council on July 16.

A sewer that washed out a road and another that caused a neighborhood stink got immediate attention from Worthington City Council on July 16.

Council passed an emergency ordinance to move ahead with the replacement of a culvert under McCoy Avenue that was damaged during heavy rains July 15.

Because the damage might have compromised the roadway, McCoy Avenue at the culvert was closed to traffic at 11 a.m. July 16. It will remain closed until the culvert is replaced, probably until the end of the year, according to city engineer Bill Watterson.

No houses are without access because of the closure.

The second sewer is a sanitary line that runs under the Olentangy River, just north of the low-head dam at Fox Lane.

Council introduced an ordinance to repair following complaints about odors on Blandford Drive.

The sewer was discovered to be the source of odors.

Council waived its request for proposal requirement to immediately hire DLZ to perform the planning process for the replacement of the storm sewer that carries water from Rush Run under McCoy Avenue.

The Worthington-based company will be paid $28,000 to prepare for the project, which had been planned for 2014. The capital improvements program (CIP) lists the cost of the project at $250,000.

The steel-arch culvert was built in 1973. Soil around it was washed away by the 3 inches of rain July 15.

Watterson showed council photographs of the damage. One showed a gas line that once was underground but now is exposed.

City staff members and DLZ are scheduled to complete plans to present to council in September. If bids are advertised at that time, the new culvert could be done between November and January, according to a memo from Watterson.

If council had not approved hiring the consultant as an emergency, the project would have taken up to a year to complete, Watterson said.

The sanitary sewer line across the Olentangy already was scheduled for construction, but the cost increased from $85,000, as listed in the CIP, to $126,000.

The cost increased when neighbors pointed out additional problems that would require more repairs.

Besides fixing the main line, which has deteriorated, the project will include repair of a concrete head wall at the south end of the low-head dam and a storm-sewer outfall at the end of Blandford.

The project will be advertised for bids in August. Construction is scheduled for October through December.