Worthington News

School board

Course names will change to mirror new mandate

By ThisWeek Community News  • 

The names of nearly 40 basic middle and high school courses will change next year to reflect curriculum changes mandated by state government.

The Worthington Board of Education is expected to approve the name changes during its next meeting but won't see new curriculum standards until next spring.

Like all districts across Ohio, Worthington must adopt new core-curriculum state standards by the 2013-14 school year.

The content of Worthington's middle and high school core courses will change by 15 percent to 90 percent, varying by class, according to district administrator Jennifer Wene.

The course name changes must be made sooner so that course catalogs could be printed. Students use the catalogs when scheduling classes for the following year.

Thirty-six course name changes were presented to the board Nov. 26. Science, social studies, mathematics and language-arts course names were changed so that they would be the same in every Ohio school district. Most of the names are similar to those used now but incorporate CCSS (core content state standards) in the name. For example, seventh-grade math classes will be called Math 7 and Pre-Algebra will be called CCSS Math 7.

Board member Marc Schare balked at being asked to approve name changes before being able to review new course content.

"Is that even legal?" he asked.

Wene assured him that is was.

The board also reviewed new course proposals for the middle and high schools. The courses are expected to be approved during the next board meeting.

The only new course to be added next year is Electronic Media Communication. It will be offered to eighth-graders at Worthingway Middle School.

It is a hands-on electronic-media and communications course that requires students to write, edit and produce a bi-weekly news program and make short movies and documentaries.

The board also is expected to vote on new courses that were introduced this year and last year. New courses go through a three-year pilot program before they become part of the approved middle and high school curricula.

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