A public meeting Wednesday, Dec. 4, will give city residents an opportunity to help plan the redevelopment of the United Methodist Children's Home site.

A public meeting Wednesday, Dec. 4, will give city residents an opportunity to help plan the redevelopment of the United Methodist Children's Home site.

The last time the community gathered to voice an opinion on the redevelopment was September 2012, when about 200 people told potential developers they definitely did not want a Giant Eagle supermarket and gas station on the 41-acre site.

That proposal was withdrawn.

This time, residents will be able to tell the city what they do want -- whether it be houses, apartments, parks, office buildings, or stores and restaurants.

The city began what it calls a "visioning" process several months ago.

The consulting firm MKSK was hired to lead the visioning process, which includes an analysis of the site, the market and public opinion.

The end result will be an update to the city's 2005 Comprehensive Plan, which recommends land uses throughout the city. The city cannot develop the land by itself, but the Comprehensive Plan helps guide developers and the city in deciding the use of land.

At the Dec. 4 meeting, to be held from 6 to 8 p.m. at Thomas Worthington High School, several preliminary drawings of possible layouts will be available for viewing and comment.

The consultant team will provide an overview of the process, demographic and market considerations, and a variety of potential land-use scenarios for discussion.

Following the presentation, attendees will be asked to review land-use scenarios and share their thoughts on a vision that complements and contributes to the prosperity and future of the city of Worthington.

The presentation materials also will be made available on the city's project website, worthington.org/Visioning UMCH, following the meeting.

The website soon will include a method for residents to comment and provide feedback on potential development ideas. The city will notify the community when the interactive tool is available, according to city spokeswoman Anne Brown.