Pssst: You have a story to tell. Specifically, you have plenty of unique experiences and perspective on life to write a memoir. And don't worry, you don't have to have scaled Mount Everest or won an Oscar in order to make your story worth reading. As writer Flannery O'Connor famously said, "The fact is that anybody who has survived his childhood has enough information about life to last him the rest of his days."

Pssst: You have a story to tell. Specifically, you have plenty of unique experiences and perspective on life to write a memoir. And don't worry, you don't have to have scaled Mount Everest or won an Oscar in order to make your story worth reading. As writer Flannery O'Connor famously said, "The fact is that anybody who has survived his childhood has enough information about life to last him the rest of his days."

The next two programs in the Worthington Libraries' Mark My Words writer's series will help you shape the raw material of your life experiences into art. Plan to attend "Writing about Illness" on April 5 and "The Art of Memoir Writing" on April 12.

In "Writing about Illness," Thomas Larson, a journalist, critic and memoirist, will discuss the intersection of narrative, medicine and healing. According to Larson, "Among the most necessary journeys these days for Americans is to heal from, or confront, the ravages of an illness -- whether yours, someone you love or someone who's your patient.

"To heal, more and more people are turning to writing about illness in book, article, essay, and journal."

Larson has written three books: The Sanctuary of Illness, The Saddest Music Ever Written and The Memoir and the Memoirist.

Alexis Wilson, who will lead "The Art of Memoir Writing," says she is "is motivated to share her personal story of a 'show-biz' upbringing, abandonment by her mother and her non-traditional family in the hope that it helps to positively alter people's perceptions, encourage difference and inspire love."

The daughter of internationally renowned director and choreographer Billy Wilson, Alexis and her brother lived with their father following their parents' divorce, and her memoir, Not So Black and White, details her experiences growing up with same-sex parents, her bi-racial heritage and her life in and around the Broadway and ballet world.

Both workshops are scheduled at Old Worthington Library, 820 High St., from 2 to 4 p.m. They are free, but registration is required; you may do so online at worthingtonlibraries.org/calendar/register, or by calling 614-807-2626.

During the library's Mark My Words sessions, experienced authors share their expertise on different genres of writing. The next workshop, on Nov. 1, will feature author Terry Eisele and artist Jonathon Riddle, who will discuss creating a graphic novel.

Meredith Southard is an adult services librarian for Worthington Libraries.