An interesting dynamic has taken shape among the top three teams in the Central District. Since ThisWeek released its first Super 7 boys basketball poll earlier this month, Northland, Gahanna and Westerville South have topped the poll.

An interesting dynamic has taken shape among the top three teams in the Central District. Since ThisWeek released its first Super 7 boys basketball poll earlier this month, Northland, Gahanna and Westerville South have topped the poll.

Combined, Northland, Gahanna and South were 38-0 overall before last Tuesday.

Ranking Northland first followed by Gahanna in second and South in third was the easiest journalistic decision ThisWeek made since we gave Larry "The Legend" Larson a weekly column.

Taken at face value it appears those three Division I teams are on a crash course for an epic showdown in March's district tournament. Upsets happen, but conservative prognosticating would have some combination of those three programs crossing paths this postseason. If and when it occurs, that interesting dynamic will be in full view.

Those three teams have proven, so far, there are different ways to achieve the same positive results.

At Northland, Satch Sullinger employs height. His son, Jared, leads the Vikings at 6-foot-9, followed by fellow Ohio State-bound teammate J.D. Weatherspoon at 6-6. In addition, the Vikings' roster features juniors Jakyl Cornley (6-2) and Roberto Pierre (6-3) and sophomore role players Devin Scott (6-7) and Jalen Robinson (6-8).

Northland fits the stereotype that tall people play basketball. We're all guilty of thinking it. A gentleman 6-5 or taller enters a room and, depending on age, we immediately think to ourselves, "That guy must play or have played basketball."

The Vikings look like a basketball team when they trot onto the court.

When it comes to Gahanna and South, looks are deceiving.

Gahanna's tallest player is Ryan Grimme (6-5), as the Lions feature a four-guard offense.

South does not have a player listed taller than 6-2, as the Wildcats one-upped Gahanna using a five-guard offense.

So far, Northland, Gahanna and South have proven there is no clear method for winning in high school basketball.

With neither South nor Gahanna featuring any size, it is easy to wonder how either team can tame the likes of Westerville North's Ralph Hill (6-6), Westerville Central's Max VanMeter (6-6) or Huber Heights Wayne's Markus Cider (6-6).

Apparently, it can be done quite simply. South beat North 49-47 on Jan. 5 and Central 59-49 on Dec. 8 and Gahanna beat Wayne 74-71 on Dec. 31.

Instead of lamenting the lack of height, Gahanna and South have turned a perceived disadvantage into confidence builder.

Herein lies the appeal of high school basketball. As the level increased, teams are more inclined to issue a traditional lineup of two guards, two forwards and a center.

In college basketball, Florida's back-to-back titles in 2006 and 2007 featured 6-10 Al Horford and 6-11 Joakim Noah. Last year's champion, University of North Carolina, featured 6-9 Tyler Hansborough.

In the NBA, the league is littered with 7-0 lottery busts that were drafted on potential.

Perhaps Gahanna and South are onto something? Their style is exciting and is netting results.

No doubt, Northland will have something to say come the postseason. With their big frontcourt, they have the appearance of a team destined for another title. Gahanna and South have proven appearances are deceiving.

Can Gahanna or South be the team to knock Northland off its perch? It'll be an interesting dynamic to watch as the season surges toward the district tournament.