A donated piece of land that helps feed people who turn to the Clintonville-Beechwold Community Resources Center's food pantry will be on the next Clintonville Open Garden Tour. The tour, which also will feature eight private gardens, is set from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, July 12.

A donated piece of land that helps feed people who turn to the Clintonville-Beechwold Community Resources Center's food pantry will be on the next Clintonville Open Garden Tour. The tour, which also will feature eight private gardens, is set from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, July 12.

This is the second tour of the year organized by local gardening enthusiasts Pat Rugola, Michael Shifrin and Karen Torvik.

"Community gardens are one of many benefits to Clintonville that are provided and sponsored by the Clintonville Resource Center," the organizers wrote in announcing the July 12 event. "There are three gardens in which people can participate: one near the CRC building; one in the parking lot adjacent to the Cornerstone Deli on High Street; and the largest piece of land abutting the railroad track at the eastern end of Midgard Road, east of Indianola Avenue."

The latter property was donated to the settlement house in 2011 by Dale Hooper when he moved away from the neighborhood, said Beth Stewart-McGee, basic needs supervisor for the CRC.

Called "MidGarden," the donated land produced 2,000 pounds of food for the pantry last year, Stewart-McGee said.

"It really helps us out," she said. "We're really excited about that (being on the garden tour) because maybe it will encourage people to take a plot next summer or donate their produce to us."

In donating the land, Hooper wanted to "promote civic agriculture and to help folks in the community," according to the tour announcement.

Jean Byrd initially was the volunteer coordinator for MidGarden, with duties now being fulfilled by local resident Derek Lory.

"It's very multifaceted," Lory said last week. "I get to either be left alone or it's also very sociable. My friends and neighbors and strangers can swing by. I choose to grow food for people who can utilize it for their own benefit.

"Many people with different levels of experience participate ... We help one another, teach one another. We learn from our mistakes. That's how every experiment happens."

One primary purpose of the garden is to give people a space to grow food that they desire," the announcement stated. "Tom-atoes, peppers, potatoes, carrots and herbs are popular choices.

"The other important goal is to help provide additional produce for clients of the CRC. Over a ton of food, literally 2,000 pounds, has been produced since the beginning of this program."

The announcement said grants and donations from local organizations sustain the garden.

The historic home was moved to the site from Kenworth Drive through the auspices of the Clintonville Historical Society, said Cliff Wiltshire, CRC development director.

"This building will enable our staff and volunteers to collect rainwater for irrigation, start new plant seedlings on-site, retrieve seeds for new plantings and provide a space for educational and informational gatherings," Wiltshire wrote in an email.

Other stops on the Clintonville Open Garden Tour include:

* 635 E. Jeffrey Place -- a rose garden with English roses and box and holly edgings; espaliered, or trained, fruit trees; topiary; herbs; and a kitchen garden in a small backyard.

* 340 Garden Road -- a large wisteria arbor sheltering a seating area; curving stone-lined beds with colorful annuals among permanent plantings.

* 4517 Rosemont Place -- a small Zen garden; a large vegetable garden accented with perennials and annuals.

* 340 Fallis Road -- raised vegetable beds that feed the family year-round in a sunny backyard; perennials and shrubs in front and side yards.

* 109 Westwood Road -- "more garden, less grass" is the theme of this extensive garden that mixes perennials, annuals and vegetables, a koi pond and fountains.

* 4 North Broadway Lane -- 1.5 acres with winding paths among large island beds containing more than 200 varieties of hosta, all labeled, and many other shade-loving plants.

* 75 E. Tulane Road -- one of Clintonville's first full-yard gardens with more than 250 varieties that provide color from April through October; especially heavy on poppies, day lilies and butterfly and hummingbird plants.

* 3539 Olentangy Blvd. -- a front-yard mixed urban garden with no turf including fruit trees, berries, an herb garden, mixed perennial and raised vegetable beds; backyard shade garden leading down to the Olentangy River floodplain with a variety of shade-tolerant perennials, both exotic and native.

For more information about the tour, email clintonvillegardens@gmail.com.