The effort to recall five members of council because of decisions they are making concerning Northam Park renewal and other city plans is not a constructive way to resolve a complex and difficult situation.

To the Editor:

The effort to recall five members of council because of decisions they are making concerning Northam Park renewal and other city plans is not a constructive way to resolve a complex and difficult situation.

While that approach is legally available to citizens to protect rights and to correct serious problems with council members' positions and actions, it is not a rational and constructive way to deal with the controversies at hand. Even if it eventually forces an outcome in the park development actions, it cannot achieve something desired by all and will further exacerbate the controversies and divisions within the community.

I, too, have questions and concerns about the approaches being taken and have preferences different in some ways from decisions made and developing. I have made those issues known to council and city management with suggestions for certain specifics and approaches, and expect they have gotten and will get due consideration in the plans and actions.

However, I fully realize that not all of the preferences of all the population, including mine, can be achieved. ... We have elected council to make such decisions, and we should support them in those complex and sometimes difficult situations.

Do not sign the recall petitions, and if they should receive enough support to be placed before the UA population in an election, vote against them. Present to council and city management any case you have for specific features and approaches for Northam Park development and other developments of current interest and then get out of the way as they must reach decisions that are best for the city as a whole.

If you think you can do better in future city decision-making, get on a future ballot and compete to become a member of council, being aware that council must act for the community as a whole, not some special interest.

Ron Wigington

Upper Arlington