The charter-altering referendum fixes the wrong problem and brings new negative economic ripple effects.

To the Editor:

The charter-altering referendum fixes the wrong problem and brings new negative economic ripple effects.

People say City Council plans in a vacuum. Nothing could be further from the truth. City Council adopted the Worthington Comprehensive Plan in 2005. It set a framework for High Street development. The big idea was to extend the city core beyond the historic district boundaries by making it more pedestrian friendly. Developments thus guided have included CVS, Dewey's and Fresh Thyme.

When residents approached City Council about the United Methodist Children's Home, council worked toward its closure. Council acted on resident concerns. The closure necessitated a Comprehensive Plan update to set a framework for acceptable future development(s) on that property.

Public input took place in 2013 and 2014. The resulting presentation is found on the city website. The update recommended planned unit development zoning and a general land use plan. PUD zoning requires developers to seek community input, go before the planning commission, make plan changes and detail the exact development plan. All involve the public. Most of the process does not involve City Council.

The referendum will not stop the UMCH development. It will stop infill development. There will be no further renovation for the areas desperately needing updates. There would be no Class A office space development encouragement. New businesses won't bring employees leaving 2.5 percent of their income for resident benefits. And Worthington's "hottest housing market" status will go away, because millennials live where they work.

Without economic development, the city will be forced to either raise income taxes or cut services.

I like parks, trash service and pothole/snow free roads. I'd rather corporate citizens pay for those services than alter my budget to accommodate increased taxes.

Our charter works. Don't fix the wrong problem. Become engaged.

Laura Ball