Contrary to their recent public statements that the authorized work in Northam Park involves only the pool and playground, UA officials showed at the Jan. 19 City Council session that they still haven't abandoned their goal of redoing Northam Park in the image of the Master Plan.

To the Editor:

Contrary to their recent public statements that the authorized work in Northam Park involves only the pool and playground, UA officials showed at the Jan. 19 City Council session that they still haven't abandoned their goal of redoing Northam Park in the image of the Master Plan.

A "shortened promenade" was disclosed by council President Debbie Johnson and a layout was shown that included two large circles for unspecified "structures" at the entrance from the parking lot.

They also said the pool and playground will be in "essentially" the same locations as before. Why not exactly the same locations, so the work doesn't cause the needless removal of mature trees? Because, they say, they want to preserve "flexibility" for future plans.

What those future plans are likely to be was suggested by the report from the committee that deliberated how to reconfigure the tennis courts and playing fields. Even though the tennis members had voted overwhelmingly to keep the courts where they are -- thereby sparing taxpayers the multi-million dollar cost of relocating them -- the city refused to consider that option.

The committee was allowed to discuss only variants of the Master Plan that put all the playing fields together in a large, continuous, treeless space and retained the promenade and other new features that residents have clearly stated they don't want. Not even after stacking the committee with interested parties who would gain space from a relocated and shrunken tennis facility could the city muster a majority vote for any recommendation.

City Council should formally reject the Master Plan and do what residents want: Spend the money on our crumbling streets and sewers. Replace the pool. Do nothing else to Northam until they provide complete, honest information and get public consent. Otherwise, answer to voters in a recall election.

Colin Jones

Upper Arlington