Once the April 20 storm passed, it didn't take long for Canal Winchester to return to business as usual, although village officials were still waiting for damage estimates as of ThisWeek's press time on Tuesday, April 26.

Once the April 20 storm passed, it didn't take long for Canal Winchester to return to business as usual, although village officials were still waiting for damage estimates as of ThisWeek's press time on Tuesday, April 26.

The village was one of the areas hardest hit by the thunderstorm that blew through central Ohio in the early hours of April 20.

The Canal Winchester school district closed for the day while the village conducted cleanup efforts and worked to restore electricity to affected areas.

"Canal Winchester was closed for power outages and closed roads due to the storm," schools Superintendent Kimberley Miller-Smith said. "Several roads were closed, with trees covering downed electric lines."

Extensive power outages led district officials to cancel classes for the day, Miller-Smith said.

"Indian and Winchester Trail (elementary schools) were without power until 10:30 a.m., while the middle school was without power until 3 p.m.," she said.

While none of the school facilities were damaged in the storm, garage doors, roofing and other portions of the city's Public Works Complex sustained damage, said Canal Winchester Public Works director Matt Peoples.

Despite the damage to the public works building, the village was able to maintain hours of operation at the facility throughout last week, he said.

Power outages throughout the community - particularly at the intersection of Gender Road and Winchester Boulevard - caused significant traffic congestion during morning rush hour on April 20.

Along with outages, the storm ripped four traffic signals completely from wires and poles at the Gender Road-Winchester Boulevard intersection, and left two other signals dangling and out of service, Peoples said.

By 1 p.m. on April 20, two of the signals had been located but were heavily damaged, but the remains of the other two had not been discovered.

"I've never seen that," he said. "I've seen poles snapped and lines damaged by downed trees, but I've never seen signals blown completely off."

As for additional damage located after the initial assessment last week, Peoples said, "Luckily, we haven't found anything else and I hope we don't."

Cemetery Road just north of Waterloo Street closed to traffic due to a downed tree that snapped power lines and laid them across the roadway. The road was reopened to traffic on Thursday.

Additionally, a privacy fence at a residence near Walmart was blown on its side and at least one home near the intersection of Waterloo Street and Cemetery Road was damaged by a downed tree, Peoples said.

"We believe we had a lighting strike, too, at a wellfield on (U.S.) 33," he said. "It blew up the batteries, literally. The tops are gone.

"By now, we've got a pretty good handle on it, but we know there are some residents that have a lot of damage."