Potential additions to the list of acceptable exterior building materials could reduce the need for Preservation District property owners to obtain Landmarks Commission permission for some maintenance projects.

Potential additions to the list of acceptable exterior building materials could reduce the need for Preservation District property owners to obtain Landmarks Commission permission for some maintenance projects.

The exterior maintenance section of the preservation guidelines, including additions to the list of acceptable materials, was the focus of the commission’s Oct. 24 meeting.

“If we have options for siding, shouldn’t we have the same sort of options for doors and roofs and windows?” commissioner Brent Foley asked.

When choosing materials to use for building maintenance, property owners may use the list found in the preservation guidelines to avoid review. Currently, some materials on the list are considered “like-for-like” and do not require a property owner to apply to the city for review; the commission would like to increase those options.

In August, Don Hartman Inc. car repair applied for permission to repair the rear of a building using HardiePlank, a type of concrete fiber siding, instead of replacing wood with wood. The commission approved the application.

“If we considered cement fiber board like HardiePlank like-for-like, then Don Hartman (Inc. car repair) wouldn’t have had to come in here,” commission member Patrick Lynch said.

“Concrete fiber is cheaper than wood, so that may keep people away from using vinyl,” he said. “This would be listed as a maintenance replacement so they wouldn’t have to come in here for approval. Any deviation from the list needs to be reviewed.”

The commission also discussed including vinyl-clad wood windows in the like-for-like materials list.

“Is there a type of wood window that is tightly vinyl-clad that could be used but is not the flush-mount vinyl? Technically, it’s a wood window on the inside. Is that something we’d consider here as a replacement?” Lynch said.

Foley said he believes the key to replacing windows is keeping the profile the same, which might require more work by the property owner to remove old sashes and frame casings.

“I think that’s one of those that ends up coming in for review because there’s so many different options there,” commissioner Will Bennett said. “I think HardiePlank is much simpler to do and match, but windows are much more complicated.”

The Landmarks Commission is scheduled to discuss the next four sections of the guidelines — porches, awnings, storefronts and commercial conversions — at its Nov. 28 meeting.

Several city commissions are currently reviewing the zoning code related to the preservation district with the goal of streamlining current guidelines and zoning text. Once those changes are finalized and moved forward to city council for approval, notifications about public hearings will be sent to all affected property owners.

Also Monday, the commission approved an application for a vinyl window sign for Falcon Technologies LLC, a new business opening at 5 S. High St.

An application from Bon Venturas LLC regarding signage for a business at 1 S. High St. remained tabled after the applicants did not appear before the commission for a second month. City planning and zoning administrator Andrew Dutton said the current sign violates city code.

Finally, Roger White State Farm Insurance Co. received permission to build an additional garage to connect an existing garage and main business structure at 71 W. Columbus St. White, a member of the Landmarks Commission, abstained from voting.

The next Landmarks Commission meeting is at 7 p.m., Monday, Nov. 28, at Town Hall, 10 N. High St.