Trolley cars, a blast from the past, will be returning to the streets of Clintonville on Saturday, Dec. 4, while many local merchants will be seeking that same day to establish a new holiday tradition that will carry on into the future.

Trolley cars, a blast from the past, will be returning to the streets of Clintonville on Saturday, Dec. 4, while many local merchants will be seeking that same day to establish a new holiday tradition that will carry on into the future.

Trolley Cars on High will be taking place through the auspices of the Clintonville Historical Society with the help of various sponsors, including Indianola Plaza, Moxie's Gifts and Dr. Kvitko, Metnes and Associates.

The free hop-on, hop-off trolley tours running along North High Street from Arcadia Avenue to Morse Road will begin at 12:30 p.m. and continue through 4 p.m., according to historical society president Mary Rodgers.

At the same time, and in conjunction with Trolley Cars on High, the Small Business Beanstalk and Shop Clintonville will be putting on "Holidayville," a neighborhood-wide event featuring promotions and specials at more than 25 businesses near tour stops.

The point of the trolley rides is to acquaint people with some of the many places with historical significance in Clintonville, according to Rodgers.

"What we're going to give our guests is a map that actually includes 50 points of interest," she said.

The point of Holidayville, according to Small Business Beanstalk founder Timothy Wolf Starr, is to acquaint central Ohio residents in general, and Clintonville residents in particular, with some of the many shopping opportunities the neighborhood has to offer.

"One of the big questions which we're all working on is trying to raise the awareness of all the hidden gems of the businesses we have in Clintonville," Star said.

These gems are hidden, he said, from even some of those who live in the community.

"It's sort of like living in New York and never going to the Statue of Liberty until friends come in," Starr said.

In addition, participating businesses will be helping to raise money for the Clintonville-Beechwold Community Resource Center. Mittens will be displayed in these businesses, containing slips of paper with items needed by CRC clients and an estimated dollar amount for their cost. Participants may select a mitten and either purchase the item to be delivered to the center in time for the holidays or return it to the merchant with the amount needed to cover the purchase, Rodgers said.

"Our tour guides will provide interesting facts about Clintonville as we wind our way around the neighborhood," according to the announcement from Rodgers. "Trolley patrons will receive the first of three walking tour maps being designed by the society in partnership with the Printed Image, using a grant from the Clintonville Community Fund. This particular tour map is an overview of the Clintonville area showing more than 35 points of interest between Hudson Avenue and Chase Road. Future maps will focus on specific portions of the Clintonville area community, and will hold more details about those areas.

"The trolley tours are free," Rodgers added. "That said, the Clintonville Historical Society is a qualified (nonprofit) organization. Your generous donations are 100-percent tax-deductible and would be much appreciated."

Trolley riders are asked to join the tour at either of two parking lots, one at the casting pond in Whetstone Park and the other at the former North High School off Arcadia Avenue. While the last tour will start at 4, Rodgers indicated that stragglers will continue to be picked up until the trolleys depart the neighborhood two hours later.

"We're hoping that it's going to be nice weather," Rodgers said. "According to the Farmer's Almanac it's going to be sunny, but cold."

Holidayville, according to Starr, is here to stay.

"It's absolutely an annual event," he said.

In fact, if things go well this time around, it might become more than just annual.

Getting everybody out and about several times a year would be ideal, obviously with different themes," Starr said.