The Great Cloth Diaper Change 2011, an awareness-raising effort as well as an attempt to land a spot in the Guinness Book of Records, was held last weekend at approximately 400 locations around the world, including Sprout Soup in Clintonville.

The Great Cloth Diaper Change 2011, an awareness-raising effort as well as an attempt to land a spot in the Guinness Book of Records, was held last weekend at approximately 400 locations around the world, including Sprout Soup in Clintonville.

The natural baby boutique, which started as an online operation five years ago and gained a physical location at 4310 N. High St. two years ago, was the only location in Columbus for the event, which was the brainchild of Judy Aagard, owner of Tiny Tots Diaper Service and Baby Boutique in the San Francisco Bay area.

A total of 28 babies had their cloth diapers changed by moms and dads at Sprout Soup on Saturday, April 23, according to Alissa DeRouchie, co-owner of the store with husband Noah DeRouchie.

"It went really well," Alissa DeRouchie said on Monday. "Everyone was excited to be there and it pretty much went flawlessly."

"Judy Aagard's desire to celebrate Earth Day by hosting a family event for the Tiny Tots community quickly morphed into a dream to set the Guinness World Record for the most cloth diapers changed simultaneously," according to the website. "Shortly thereafter, The Great Cloth Diaper Change 2011 was conceived and organized by a small group of cloth diaper enthusiasts that were eager to show North America that cloth diapers are a real option for today's families. The initial plan was to develop an infrastructure for any cloth diapering fan in North America to be able to get involved in, either as a participant or an organizer. Word quickly traveled across the oceans and it was soon evident that cloth diapering has a formidable following not just in North America but around the world. Currently, several countries will be hosting locations to help set the World Record, even though for some it will mean getting up in the middle of the night to do so.

"Cloth diapering is alive and well."

"Certainly, the reason for doing this was to raise awareness about cloth diapers," DeRouchie said. "A lot of people think of it as old -fashioned, but cloth diapers really have kept up with the times."

Developments in fabric used for cloth diapers makes it far easier today to use them than it was 20 years ago, the store owner added.

"Yes, it is great for Mother Earth, but it doesn't have to be hard and it doesn't have to be gross," DeRouchie said. "It can be a lot of fun, too."

The parents who turned out for the Great Cloth Diaper Change all appeared to enjoy themselves a good deal, according to DeRouchie. These included a couple visiting from out of town who heard about the event and managed to find the only local site.

Door prizes and goody bags from manufacturers whose products Sprout Soup carries helped to add to the fan for participants, the store owner said.

Now that Saturday's flurry of cloth diapering is in the past, it's time for some considerable paperwork for DeRouchie. She said many forms have to be filled out and turned in from all of the participating locations in not only the United States but also Brazil, Indonesia, Latvia, Switzerland, Tanzania and the United Kingdom.

DeRouchie isn't certain how long it will be before it's known if sufficient diapers were changed to make the Guinness list.

She's also not certain at this point if Sprout Soup will be participating in the planned Great Cloth Diaper Change 2012. Pulling off this first one, she said, was a lot more work than she had anticipated.

"I feel like we didn't have all the information up front when we signed on," DeRouchie said. "It was a little bit chaotic at the end.

"It's something that I hope we can do but I can't commit yet, not until I have more information."