A man charged with shooting a Columbus SWAT officer early Sunday at a Clintonville apartment building was originally wanted on a felony arson warrant, accused of setting fire to his ex-girlfriend's house on Fairlawn Drive a day earlier.

A man charged with shooting a Columbus SWAT officer early Sunday at a Clintonville apartment building was originally wanted on a felony arson warrant, accused of setting fire to his ex-girlfriend's house on Fairlawn Drive a day earlier.

Now Lincoln S. Rutledge, 44, also is charged with felonious assault. Franklin County Prosecutor Ron O'Brien has filed a motion asking that Rutledge to be held without bond because of the circumstances surrounding the case.

Rutledge is accused of firing at officers trying to serve him with a warrant on the arson charge at about 2:30 a.m. April 10 during a standoff that began about three hours earlier at 14 W. California Ave., his apartment in a six-unit building just west of North High Street.

Rutledge surrendered nearly five hours after the shooting, but not before the apartment building caught fire, too, causing extensive damage.

Officer Steven M. Smith remained in critical condition at Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center at ThisWeek's press time on Monday. Police Chief Kim Jacobs asked for prayers for the veteran SWAT officer on Sunday.

"Our officer is in very critical condition, and we won't know what happens to him for some time. It is very serious, and we need everyone to pray for him," she said.

Rutledge was being treated for what appeared to be a gunshot wound and smoke inhalation, according to police spokesman Sgt. Rich Weiner.

Rutledge's injures didn't appear "very serious at all," Jacobs said.

According to a warrant, surveillance video from an undisclosed location captured images of Rutledge's car backing into the driveway of the house on Fairlawn Drive and smoke coming from the residence as he left the scene.

Neighbors said Rutledge once stayed at the house there with a girlfriend but that they broke up last fall. The woman who lives at the house was out of town when the fire broke out Saturday morning.

Firefighters were able to extinguish the blaze quickly. Most of the damage occurred at the back end of the house.

Jacobs said SWAT officers were used to serve the warrant because Rutledge had exhibited "erratic behavior" and was known to have weapons. Rutledge then barricaded himself inside his California Avenue apartment at 11:34 p.m. Saturday.

About three hours after the siege began, "SWAT tried to use their armored vehicle to approach the residence, and at the time they came under fire," Jacobs said.

The shots came from a rear, first-floor window of the apartment.

Officer Smith was in the armored vehicle, Weiner said. He received immediate treatment from Fire Division medics who were at the scene.

SWAT officers "train with medic squads to be near the scene and to be ready to go in even under unstable conditions," Jacobs said. "We were using as many protective measures as we possibly could. And yet despite all of those protective measures, you cannot successfully deal with a situation like this without being vulnerable in some way."

Dispatch reporter Jim Woods contributed to this story.