It took a while, but Clintonville Area Commission election committee Chairman Peter Niswander finally found someone willing to take Kristopher Keller's place as the District 8 representative.

It took a while, but Clintonville Area Commission election committee Chairman Peter Niswander finally found someone willing to take Kristopher Keller's place as the District 8 representative.

Attorney Christopher J. Allwein, a resident of the neighborhood for the past 14 years, is almost assured of a seat on the advisory panel once the votes are counted May 7. Allwein will run as the lone write-in candidate for the seat being vacated by Keller, who opted not to seek another term in order to make a bid for the 24th Ohio House District.

The other two seats up for election next month also will be uncontested.

No one filed to run against either Libby Wetherholt in District 3 or incumbent District 6 representative Randy Ketcham.

"Do you think it was the Ketcham machine that scared them off?" Ketcham joked last week.

On a serious note, he expressed some dismay that no District 6 residents seemed interested in replacing him on the CAC.

"I'm surprised and just a little disappointed that nobody ran," he said. "Clintonville is normally such an engaged community, especially with all the development that's been going on. You'd think more people would be interested in running for the commission."

Wetherholt said she hopes the lack of an opponent in the race isn't a sign of apathy in her district. "It seems there is more opposition when there's controversy," she said.

Both incumbents said they have enjoyed their time on the commission, which is why they decided to run again.

"It's been a good experience," Wetherholt said. "I have met a lot of new people and I've learned a lot, learned how to connect with people in city government."

"One reason I am seeking re-election, which I really didn't think I'd do when I ran the first time, I think I benefited from what I call a learning curve," Ketcham said. "It takes a while to realize how the commission acts and interact with citizens and get to know how the city works.

"And I've met a lot of good people who really care about Clintonville."

Wetherholt said despite the unopposed election, she hopes people still will cast ballots from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 7 at the Whetstone branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library.

"We would like everybody to come and vote even if there's no opposition to show they're interested in what's happening with the commission," she said.

"I will go out on a limb and predict re-election," Ketcham said. "I'll have to make sure to vote for myself."

Allwein specializes in energy and utility law at Kegler, Brown, Hill and Ritter, according to the firm's website. He is a graduate of Capital University Law School.

"It wasn't so much that I was talked into it as I was effectively persuaded that we should try to avoid the specter of District 8 being unrepresented," Allwein said.

The attorney said he is interested in the activities of the area commission, particularly in light of the development that's taking place in the neighborhood.

"It's obvious that a lot of people want to move to Clintonville and there are various development projects going on to facilitate that," Allwein said. "I understand what the commission's purpose is. I've already looked through the revised code and checked through the website. I talked to Kris Keller a lot. We had a good conversation.

"I see this as a way of getting to know more what's going on in the neighborhood and getting to know my neighbors more and get their feelings about all the new activity."