Clintonville Historical Society President Mary Rodgers said last week she is targeting July 2 as the date of a formal announcement about placing a new group of historical markers around the neighborhood.

Clintonville Historical Society President Mary Rodgers said last week she is targeting July 2 as the date of a formal announcement about placing a new group of historical markers around the neighborhood.

The locations for the double-sided markers are set in -- well, metal, but the wording on them will be something those who attend the announcement can help fine-tune, she said.

The additions will bring to nine the number of markers denoting historic aspects of Clintonville.

"I think it's very important because where you live has a history, and it's important to what you are today," said Libby Wetherholt, District 3 Clintonville Area Commission representative and a member of the society's board of directors. "A lot of people don't pay attention to history and certainly don't have good thoughts about studying history in school, but it applies to our daily lives and is just one way of giving some background to our community."

"I'm really supportive of the idea," said Greg Denby, another board member and manager of the Whetstone branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library. "Part of what we want to do with the markers is to really make the history obvious to people in the community. A lot of the newer residents understand Clintonville is a historical area, but they don't really know the history.

"We're trying to make that history a little bit more accessible to people."

Denby added the new signs also may encourage more people to walk around Clintonville.

"We're thinking that these historical markers will add a little bit of interest for pedestrians," he said.

Society members had hoped to add more than four signs to the existing five, but Rodgers said a grant application was not approved, so around $9,000 raised independently for the project will fund the four.

They are to be located at, and will commemorate:

* Indian Springs Drive and North High Street, the Webster Cemetery on one side and Bill Moose on the other

* Cooke Road and Indianola Avenue, the Dominion Land Co. and Adena Mound on one side and the nearby mural on the other

* East North Broadway, permanently replacing the existing one for the street's Historic District designation, North Broadway on one side and Clinton Schools on the other

* Dominion Boulevard and North High Street, Beechwold on one side and the Midge Urban Cottages on the other.

"We talked a lot about which ones to look at first," Wetherholt said. "I thought all of them were excellent choices, and it just was a matter of making a choice about which ones would ... at least hit a number of people."

The existing five markers, some put up by other organizations, including the Franklin County Historical Society, are located at:

* Charity Newsies on Indianola Avenue

* The Ohio School for the Deaf on Morse Road

* The Ohio School for the Blind on North High Street

* The Clintonville marker at North High and North Broadway

* The Hollenback marker on the Whetstone Library's exterior wall.

"We hope to keep fundraising," Rodgers said. "We would love to do more of these and continue to make it something that, if you were walking along High Street or you were walking along Indianola, you would encounter these and learn more about the community."

"These markers are iconic and made to last, so our history will be preserved not only for current residents and visitors, but for all those who may wander through or settle in Clintonville in the future," historical society board member Catherine Gullett wrote in an email. "Because these markers are installed as close to their actual historical site as possible, they act as a physical tie between the past and present, which helps the public visualize the connection between the modern and historical settings."

The formal announcement of the markers will be made at 3 p.m. July 2 in the community room at the Whetstone library.