Delaware City Council recently "got a flavor" of what the new YMCA Community Center and Ohio National Guard training facility on Houk Road will look like when it opens in 2011.

Delaware City Council recently "got a flavor" of what the new YMCA Community Center and Ohio National Guard training facility on Houk Road will look like when it opens in 2011.

Nearly complete design plans -- prepared after months of meetings between the community committee charged with working with the design team from Poggemeyer Design Group and Mark Wentzell, a design architect with the Ankeny Kell architectural firm from Minnesota -- were shown to council Dec. 14.

"Our goal is to update you on the site and layout and give you a feel and flavor for the building," designer Scott Schroeder told council.

He then walked council through a PowerPoint presentation of exterior and interior drawings of not only the community center, which will be operated by the YMCA of Central Ohio, but the National Guard facility.

"We have tried to break up the 'big box' feel of the building using different architectural styles," Schroeder said.

The community center is set to open in 2011 and the adjacent National Guard facility in 2013.

The city should be ready to bid the community center project in the first 45 days of 2010, said city manager Tom Homan, who believes a "competitive market" will bring the project in at or under budget.

Once both facilities are built, the building will have 150,000 square feet, about half for the YMCA center and the other half for the National Guard, Homan said. The guard building will be vacant much of the time, except on drill weekends, so the YMCA will have use of the assembly hall as a gym, a full kitchen and other space during the guard's down times.

Voters in August 2008 narrowly supported a 0.15-percent income tax increase that could last up to 20 years and generate nearly $23.8-million in revenue to build the new community center, upgrade existing fields and install new athletic fields at the Houk Road site

The city is ready to issue $20.8-million in bonds for the project which Homan said will pay for the center and some, but not all of the work on the fields. A separate bond issue will be needed to pay for the remaining work, he said.