Johnstown residents who want to get rid of their old clothes and antiques must follow proper procedures to avoid being penalized during the yard sale season.

Johnstown residents who want to get rid of their old clothes and antiques must follow proper procedures to avoid being penalized during the yard sale season.

Village council member Joyce Evans said those rules include filing for a $5 permit from the village for each sale and knowing where the placement of yard sale signs is permitted.

Evans asked the planning and zoning committee during a combined council and committee meeting July 11 what could be done with the recent influx of signs all around town.

"The yard sale (sign) is supposed to be in the yard that the sale is occurring in," Evans said, "or their next-door neighbor's yard with permission from the next-door neighbor. You just can't stick them up anywhere and everywhere."

Evans said she's seen several signs on utility poles, in Bigelow Park, at intersections and along the public roads.

"Over the last two weeks, I've picked up about 25 signs," Evans said. "They're just everywhere.

"I'm kind of proud of this village and I think these signs up everywhere are kind of tacky," she said.

"The biggest problem with the signs is they are still out days after the sale is over, blowing in the wind or saturated with rain and found lying on the ground or in the street," added Jim Lenner, village manager.

Council member Sean Staneart said the yard sale signs are just part of the "normal summer rush."

He said he's more concerned with residents buying a permit.

Staneart said police could stop at yard sales to make sure residents have a permit, but said the village isn't going to dedicate officers to that specific task.

"I would encourage people to get a permit," he said, "but I don't think it's to the point where we need to call in the police or anything."

Johnstown Village Council passed the $5 permit ordinance in October 2008.

The ordinance also limits residents to three yard sales per year, excluding Labor Day weekend, when the village doesn't require permits.

The ordinance states the sale sign may be placed on neighboring properties within 3,000 feet of the sale, with written permission of the property owners.

The signs can't be placed in public property or rights of way.

The ordinance also states that the signs may be displayed one day prior to the yard sale and must be removed within 24 hours of the end of the sale.

Staneart said the planning and zoning committee is discussing whether to put permit and signage information on residents' water bills to remind homeowners of proper procedures.

"We don't want to get in a situation where we're policing garage sale signs, but maybe we could just make more people aware of it," Staneart said.

He said businesses must follow the same rules. Companies also can't promote their businesses by putting signs along village roads or at intersections.