Dublin's events, attractions, restaurants, central location and hospitality make our city such an attractive place to visit. One of the city's most distinctive and treasured attractions that appeals to residents and visitors is Historic Dublin.

Dublin's events, attractions, restaurants, central location and hospitality make our city such an attractive place to visit. One of the city's most distinctive and treasured attractions that appeals to residents and visitors is Historic Dublin.

The Dublin Convention and Visitors Bureau's mission, to attract out-of-town visitors and their travel dollars to the city of Dublin, is made much easier when we have a distinctive product that we can market. Historic Dublin features centuries-old buildings adjacent to new structures, seamlessly blending the old with the new as the backdrop for a vibrant town center with upscale urban amenities. Chic restaurants, eclectic shopping and professional service businesses showcase unique dining, nightlife, shopping and gathering options, all within walking distance of parks and rolling bike paths that parallel the natural boundaries of the Scioto River.

The bureau uses several tactics to promote and attract visitors to this great destination. Selling Historic Dublin to group tours has been highly successful. These motor-coach groups, each comprising 40 to 50 people, travel from all parts of the Midwest, looking for unusual destinations to explore. Bureau staff members host these visitors and often escort them throughout the district on "Four Leaf Clover Scavenger Hunts," where they stop and shop at local merchants, and then visit restaurants in the district for lunch or dinner. Just this year alone, the bureau hosted more than 50 bus tours in Historic Dublin, traveling from 15 states. That's a lot of economic impact for Historic Dublin and the city of Dublin.

Group tours aren't the only visitors coming to town. In fact, the bureau markets Historic Dublin to travelers attending conventions and trade shows at a Dublin hotel who are looking for day or evening activities, leisure travelers looking for a weekend getaway, families visiting Dublin for youth athletics events, etc.

The bureau creates and utilizes numerous other tools to promote and market Historic Dublin. The bureau works closely with the city and the Historic Dublin Business Association on projects that ultimately benefit Historic Dublin. One such example is the collaboration to create and market events like Slainte Thursdays, the Dublin farmers market and various special events. The partnerships also include the creation of promotional efforts, such as creating a walking guide, brochures and packages.

For this village character to have survived so well is a credit to those who have worked tirelessly to maintain the historical integrity of the district, a thriving community with residences, businesses and events that give soul to the heart of Dublin. The city of Dublin, Dublin City Council and the Dublin Historical Society have made tremendous commitments and improvements over the years, including crosswalks/ sidewalks, signs, landscaping, on-roadway placards, lighting, parking and, most recently, BriHi Square, which was dedicated in July.

For additional information about Historic Dublin, visit our website at www.IrishisanAttitude.com or stop by the Dublin Visitor and Information Center in the heart of Historic Dublin, at 9 S. High St. It's open seven days a week.

Scott Dring is the executive director of the Dublin Convention & Visitors Bureau.