The Riverside Park project can enter the next phase of development thanks to Dublin City Council's approval of the master plan Monday, May 23.

The Riverside Park project can enter the next phase of development thanks to Dublin City Council's approval of the master plan Monday, May 23.

Project funding would come from the city's capital fund, said Matt Earman, director of parks and recreation.

Staff will create phasing and financial framework for the project and present that to council at the five-year Capital Improvements Program workshop planned for 6:30 p.m. Aug. 15 in City Hall.

Council members already funded the design of the park's pedestrian bridge that would connect the Scioto River's east and west banks from Historic Dublin to the new Bridge Park development, Earman said.

The bridge's construction is included in the 2017 capital fund council is considering for adoption.

The bridge's design and construction is estimated to cost $20 million. The city would begin construction in 2017 and complete the bridge during the latter part of 2018.

In 2013, council approved the river corridor framework planning effort.

In addition to the pedestrian bridge, other features of the project could include plazas, a lawn space, pathways and trails, river access and overlooks, and access to Indian Run Falls.

"What we would likely be proposing is the start of the construction of the pedestrian bridge and the two plazas," Earman said.

The city estimates a 5- to 7-year phasing cycle for the project, although that isn't council's assessment, Earman said.

Timing will depend upon how much funding is available during each of the phases, and how council wants the phases to be prioritized. The total estimated cost for the approximately 35-acre development is $44 million.

During discussions Monday, Councilwoman Chris Amorose Groomes said she struggled with the magnitude of the project.

Councilwoman Amy Salay said the project would be among the top two projects she would be most proud of during her time on council.

It deserves that ranking, "Because this is going to be the piece that's going to define the community," Salay said.

Council members unanimously approved the master plan. Groomes said she voted for the master plan because doing so just meant that council was giving staff permission to pursue pricing for the project.

Council members also determined they would review a list of possible park names to be collected from staff and the public.