Avery Evans was in kindergarten the first time she saw her cousins compete in the Soap Box Derby World Championship.

Avery Evans was in kindergarten the first time she saw her cousins compete in the Soap Box Derby World Championship.

Now, continuing a family legacy, the Dublin Davis Middle School eighth-grader will compete in the FirstEnergy All-American Soap Box Derby World Championship July 10-16 at the Derby Downs Track in Akron.

Evans, 13, won the local stock division May 7 at Big Run Park, where she first began racing at 8 years old.

She said she would have been embarrassed if her family didn't get to go to Akron like her cousins, uncles and dad.

"I really wanted to experience that, getting to go to Akron like they did," Evans said.

Her father, Dylan, and two uncles, Dan and Colin, won the Columbus race themselves during the 1970s and 1980s.

Dylan Evans placed fifth in the 1981 World Championship. His father, Avery Evans' grandfather Paul, raced in the 1940s.

Avery Evans' sisters, Bailey, 12, and Emerson, 9, and brother, Nathan, 9, competed alongside her in the Columbus race, which had 18 cars participating.

The cars are built from a kit.

During the gravity-powered races, the cars must weigh 200 pounds, so weights are added inside the car accordingly.

How the cars are built, where the weights are placed and how the driver controls the car as it goes down the hill are all factors in posting a fast race time.

Participants competed against each other in two-race rounds.

The winners of each round were determined by taking the average of their race times down the hill.

Evans' mother, Leanne, said her daughter had a great deal of time to make up after the first race in what would be her winning round.

"I couldn't even watch that final one, because I knew she was so far behind," she said.

Bailey Evans placed second in the Columbus competition last year, but Mrs. Evans said the 12-year-old was crying happy tears when her sister won this year.

Avery Evans said seeing the younger girl she ended up beating reminded her of how her sister must have felt taking second place.

"I felt bad," she said.

Avery said after she won, she wasn't sure who she was happier for -- her dad or herself.

Her siblings are all excited for her, too, she said.

"Hopefully we can keep the tradition going," she said.

ssole@thisweeknews.com

@ThisWeekSarah