Wyandot Elementary School's new principal knew she wanted to work in the Dublin City School District since she graduated from college.

Wyandot Elementary School's new principal knew she wanted to work in the Dublin City School District since she graduated from college.

Renae Schwartz has lived in Dublin for 15 years. She said she and husband Branden moved here because they knew the schools were excellent.

"I can't wait to represent the community I live in," she said.

Schwartz officially began her tenure with Dublin Aug. 1. Superintendent Todd Hoadley said she's the district's only new principal for the new school year. Schwartz succeeds Heather Habrecht, who district officials said left to focus on family.

Hoadley called Schwartz a "veteran administrator" and said he's excited to see what she will bring to the district.

She has a "really, really strong instructional background," Hoadley said.

Schwartz most recently served as principal at Carlisle Elementary School in the Delaware City School District. It was a position she held since 2013.

Previous administrative positions include principal at Licking Heights South Elementary School and assistant principal at Licking Heights West Elementary School.

She has a bachelor of science degree in human ecology from Ohio State University and a master's degree in administration in grades K-9 from Ashland University.

Doug Baker, Dublin's coordinator of public information, said Schwartz has a salary of $100,481 with benefits totaling 30 percent of that number, for a total compensation of $130,625. She was among 88 people who applied for the position.

Schwartz said her experience coaching varsity and junior varsity softball at Dublin Coffman High School from 2002 to 2003 helped her learn about the community.

"There was no doubt that this was where we were supposed to be," she said.

As a third-grader, she was inspired by a teacher to become an educator, Schwartz said.

"There is nothing else I can imagine doing," she said.

Working with elementary students is exciting because educators have the opportunity to start students' educational career and make it a positive experience, Schwartz said.

"They are so eager to learn and to grow, and they love you, and you treat them with respect and fairness, they're going to treat you the same way," she said.

ssole@thisweeknews.com

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