Dublin City School District Superintendent Todd Hoadley told the district's staff the process to obtain the former Verizon building on Emerald Parkway hasn't been easy.

Dublin City School District Superintendent Todd Hoadley told the district's staff the process to obtain the former Verizon building on Emerald Parkway hasn't been easy.

"It's not going smoothly. It's been a challenge," Hoadley said, adding the Dublin school board doesn't back away from challenges.

"We do what's right for the community, and we do what is right for children," he said.

The effort to obtain the building at 5175 Emerald Parkway was one of the points Hoadley focused on during his address at the district's staff convocation Aug. 16 at Dublin Scioto High School.

Board members July 11 approved the district filing suit against the building's owner via eminent domain, which Hoadley said it has yet to do.

The district had identified the building as an ideal alternative to a fourth high school.

Hoadley said the district still is having conversations with the owner, Colorado-based Emerald Parkway Valley Equity Group LLC, in an effort to reach an agreement, but expects the district will file suit within the next 30 days.

"We'll still have three college-prep high schools, but we know that doesn't work for every student," Hoadley told staff.

He said the Verizon building is one of the district's efforts to develop new types of education for students.

The facility would supplement rather than replace Tolles Career & Technical Center, which only 71 out of 2,400 juniors and seniors chose to attend last academic year, he said.

The district's efforts with the Verizon building were part of Hoadley's discussion about the district's master planning progress.

During the next 10 years, officials estimate Dublin's student body will grow by 3,000 students, he said.

As a result, the district is expected to need two additional elementary schools, a fifth middle school and the alternative high school option.

"As we continue to grow, it is so important that we stay together as one," he said.

As many as 2,000 staff members attended the convocation to mark the start of school, which began Aug. 17.

Among the attendees were members of the city of Dublin's administrative staff, Dublin City Council members and state Rep. Mike Duffey (R-Worthington).

Hoadley congratulated Duffey in his legislative work regarding Win-Win agreements the Columbus City School District holds with central Ohio school districts, including Dublin.

Board members July 5 approved a new Win-Win agreement with Columbus that made Dublin's district boundaries permanent.

Wright Elementary School firstgrade teacher Kelli Traber said the new agreement makes Wright, located in Columbus, truly a part of the Dublin district.

Hoadley thanked board members along with Duffey for their work regarding Win-Win.

Sixty percent of students in the district live outside the city of Dublin corporation boundaries, he said, and a large percentage of those live in Columbus.

Families that had been in Win-Win districts had previously faced the possibility their districts could have been transferred to another district when the previous agreement came up for renewal every six years.

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