A hair salon looking to expand its footprint in Dublin is trying to avoid setting aside land for a road that could bisect its property in the future.

A hair salon looking to expand its footprint in Dublin is trying to avoid setting aside land for a road that could bisect its property in the future.

Dublin City Council on Dec. 5 will hear an appeal from Charles Penzone Salon to forego creating right of way as part of a project that includes the construction of a 12,600-square-foot building and parking.

According to a memo to council members, the project plan includes 85 parking spaces, 54 spaces above the allowable maximum.

One of the requirements for the project was that the applicant work with the city to determine where to locate a dedicated neighborhood street right of way at no cost to the city.

Dublin City Councilwoman Amy Salay, who sits on the Dublin Planning and Zoning Commission, said the community has given a "substantial" amount of feedback expressing concern about introducing a street in the area.

According to the council memo, during previous public hearings and staff meetings, several residents expressed concerns with a neighborhood street connection into the Greystone Mews subdivision, which is west of the Penzone property.

Residents cited concerns with safety and worried that a street would decrease property values, increase traffic and invite non-resident traffic into the neighborhood.

The subdivision already has three or four entry points into the neighborhood, Salay said.

She said Planning and Zoning Commission members were uncomfortable casting aside the thoroughfare plan, which called for creating the right of way, but still wanted residents' concerns to be heard.

Matthew Dunlap, chief operating officer with Penzone, said the project plans include converting the existing salon to office space and building a new salon nearby.

"If the right of way were to go through, what that would do is eliminate 40 parking spots," he said.

That loss of parking would "not allow us to function," Dunlap said.

There is no definitive timeline on when a road would be built, he said.

Rob Rishel, a partner with Penzone's legal representation Rinehart, Rishel & Cuckler Ltd. said the road is defined in city code as a neighborhood access road and would be a two-way street.

A letter to council from Rinehart, Rishel & Cuckler Ltd. said Penzone at its Dublin location has 163 employees with a payroll of $4 million.

The new building would consolidate an additional 52 corporate employees who now work in Liberty Township and bring to Dublin an additional $3 million in payroll, for a total of $7 million.

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