The Gahanna community is invited to "Diaspora -- Voices of an Ever-Changing America" beginning at 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 30, in the Gahanna Lincoln High School auditorium, 140 S. Hamilton Road.

The Gahanna community is invited to "Diaspora -- Voices of an Ever-Changing America" beginning at 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 30, in the Gahanna Lincoln High School auditorium, 140 S. Hamilton Road.

Admission to the show is donation only, with all proceeds going to the school's GahannaThon that benefits Children's Miracle Network Hospital.

Diaspora is celebrating its fourth year at the high school and features students performing theater monologues, song, dance, rap and spoken-word performances.

The Lionettes, the high school dance team, also will be showcased.

The word, diaspora, is defined as a group of people who live outside the area in which they had lived for a long time or in which their ancestors had lived.

The program is one of the school's Black History Month programs, said Johnel Amerson, a show adviser and school psychologist. Other advisers are Donja Bridges, English teacher; Tia Holliman, dean of high school curriculum and instruction; and Keah Germany, work- and family-life teacher.

About 50 students make up the cast, who auditioned for the show and have been rehearsing after school for several weeks.

Amerson said performances represent different periods and cultural attributes.

"We are proud of the fact that not only does the show demonstrate the impact of African-American culture on America, but it is also an opportunity for the students to showcase their own personality and voice," she said. "Truthfully, this is our favorite part of this project."

Junior Alexis Young will participate in two numbers during the show.

"I'm in a cast called Glory with a group of students," she said. "It's a diverse group. Some will sing and one plays violin and another cello. I'll be singing John Legend's part. Another girl will be doing a rap part."

Young also will sing a solo, Misty Blue, by Dorothy Moore.

"I love being a part of helping kids come together," Young said. "I love the diversity of kids that make this show what it is. It celebrates the culture of African-American history."

The cast performed for students and high school staff members Jan. 15.

"The student body and staff loved it," Young said. "That's what we wanted. We wanted them to feel something while we were performing. I think a lot of people were standing for us."

Amerson said all student classes and ability levels are represented in the show.

"We have found that all students have something they can offer to the program," she said. "We have students from different races, religions and ability levels involved in celebrating the contributions and influences of African-Americans. This makes our hearts smile."