About four years ago, Donna Burns and her husband set out to find an area garage. What they ended up with was an art studio and gallery.

About four years ago, Donna Burns and her husband set out to find an area garage. What they ended up with was an art studio and gallery.

"We were actually just looking for garages because we don't have a garage at home," Burns said. "The cars are still parked outside and the garages are full."

Art at 185, located at 185 Columbus St., is Burns' work and display space. Nearly every day, Burns, who has lived in the area for 15 years, walks to the gallery to paint.

"I try to go down as often as I can," Burns said. "I go down there just about every day and work for a couple of hours."

"It's a working studio more than it is a gallery," she added.

But pinning Art at 185 into a category is difficult. Burns, a retired art teacher, insists the location is an extension of her lifelong affair with art. It also happens to be a location for her friends to display their work and for her to sell her own pieces.

Regardless of what Art at 185 is, the former automobile repair shop continues to run strong. One just has to know where the small business is hiding and the hours of its operation.

"I'm off the beaten path," Burns said. "It's not someplace where people are going to pass by and stop in. It has to be a destination."

The hours of operation are an appropriate complement to the location. If Burns isn't at the shop, there's a sign telling people how to get in touch with her.

"I don't keep regular hours, but I'm usually home," Burns said. "I live around the corner from the studio. It takes me about two minutes to walk over. There's a sign on the window that says, 'Call me.'"

Burns is quick to note that Art at 185 isn't like the better-known galleries in the area.

"I'm not one of those," she said. "I'm not big enough. It's a single room, really -- long and narrow."

At the moment, the studio and gallery has works by several artists on display. Besides Burns' pieces, there are prints by wildlife painter John Ruthven and resident Brandon Moon. In February, there will be a display of digital works by John Choi.

"I don't, as a rule, exhibit a lot of other paintings," Burns said. "If it's an artist who's a friend, that's fine with me."

Burns' own work includes multiple subjects and styles.

"I do it all," she said. "I do animals. I do portraits. I do landscapes if I feel like it. I don't want to get involved in just one thing."