Boulevard Presbyterian Church is greatly expanding its second annual recycling day to include items beyond computers and electronics.

Boulevard Presbyterian Church is greatly expanding its second annual recycling day to include items beyond computers and electronics.

The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, May 7, at the church, 1275 Northwest Blvd.

In addition to computers, the church will be collecting major appliances and scrap metal, as well as arts and educational supplies, which will be distributed to the needy. Many things will not be accepted, such as lights, furniture, paint and other household toxins.

A full list of appropriate and unacceptable items is available online at blvdchurch.org.

All computer hard drive data will be destroyed and unrecoverable. A nominal fee will be charged for television recycling.

The Rev. James Sledge, pastor of Boulevard Presbyterian, said recycling day will coincide with communitywide yard sale in Grandview Heights. The "Great Garage Sale" is being held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. that day.

There's also a community outreach aspect to the event, Sledge said. Residents who register their email addresses and contact information will be eligible to win a Kindle electronic book. The system will allow non-parishioners to communicate with the church and address issues in which they would like to see Boulevard Presbyterian become more involved.

"It just seemed all of us together could do more," Sledge said. "And it's a way to connect to the community rather than just be in the community."

Parishioner Ken Odiorne said the congregation decided to expand the list of recycling because of the success at last year's inaugural event, in which 18 cubic yards of computer equipment was collected.

The idea for recycling day was the result of an adult education class, often referred to as "creation care," which relates to the preservation of the environment in a Christian context, he said.

"I see that the Christian message is in no small part about relationships, not just between Christians and non-Christians, but also relationships between people and God's creation," he said.