The Nov. 8 election for Grandview Heights City Council is an uncontested race, with three candidates on the ballot for three seats.

The Nov. 8 election for Grandview Heights City Council is an uncontested race, with three candidates on the ballot for three seats.

Incumbents Steve Gladman and Ed Hastie and former council member Milt Lewis are running for office.

Council member Steve Von Jasinski opted against running for another term on council and is running for mayor.

Gladman, 62, is president of the Affordable Housing Trust for Columbus and Franklin County. He is completing his first term on council.

“I’m running because I want to help continue the work we’ve done on council the last four years to address the difficult budget issues we’ve faced,” he said.

Finances will continue to be the biggest issue facing council over the next four years and finding ways “to be able to continue to provide the same level of quality services our residents enjoy” within the budget limits, Gladman said.

Hastie, 33, is a small-business attorney.

He has lived in Grandview his entire life, aside from his years in college and law school, and is completing his first term on council.

“I really enjoy being on council and enjoy serving my hometown,” Hastie said. “Serving on council is a way I can give back to the community.”

The city continues to face challenging financial issues, he said.

“Every year we take in less and less money and every year requires us to spend more money,” Hastie said. “We have to have the foresight to take the right actions to get us through not just the next week or the next few months but the next few years” until the Grandview Yard development begins to pay large financial dividends.

Lewis, 49, is director of construction services for the Columbus Downtown Development Corp.

He previously served on council from 2003-07.

Lewis said that while he enjoyed his first stint on council, he decided at the time not to run again because it was taking too much time away from his family. His youngest daughter has now started college, so he is ready to serve again.

The fiscal challenges facing the city are perhaps even greater than they were four years ago due to the loss of state funding for local government, he said.

“Bringing in new development and seeing some tax revenue from that development is still a major challenge,” Lewis said.

The city should “take a much harder look at shared services and see if there are opportunities to reduce costs,” he said.