Grandview Heights City Council approved a resolution Monday, April 20, that rejects discrimination of any kind and encourages the Ohio General Assembly to consider legislation to ensure the equal protection of all residents, including the LGBT community.

Grandview Heights City Council approved a resolution Monday, April 20, that rejects discrimination of any kind and encourages the Ohio General Assembly to consider legislation to ensure the equal protection of all residents, including the LGBT community.

The resolution also calls for other central Ohio communities to pass similar legislation.

Council member Steve Gladman, who sponsored the resolution, said City Attorney Joelle Khouzam also is working to develop legislation to ensure equality and enforcement of services for all residents of the city.

"It's more complex than one might think at first blush, so we're looking at a variety of other ordinances that have been passed" in other communities, Gladman said. "The issue becomes one of enforceability and mechanisms that larger cities have that we don't have."

The city of Bexley is considering a discrimination ordinance that resulted after a lesbian couple spoke out about a wedding photographer in that community who refused them service because of their sexual orientation.

Gladman said he planned to attend a work session of Bexley City Council on Tuesday, April 21, "to see if in fact it's practical."

The issue of equal protection for LGBT residents in Grandview was raised at the April 6 meeting of Grandview City Council by 15-year resident Holly Hahn, who asked whether the city had adopted an ordinance, as Columbus has, that prohibits discrimination in housing and employment due to sexual orientation.

Khouzam said the city does not have any specific legislation other than measures that follow federal and state law.

The LGBT community "still does not have that protection under federal law or in Ohio," Hahn said, "so it is up to individual cities at this point."

Also at the April 20 meeting, council approved an ordinance that amends the city's competitive-bid standards to allow more flexibility in selecting project delivery methods for public works.

The measure allows the city's competitive bid requirement to be waived for projects the city determines to be best-suited to the construction-manager-at-risk or design-build-delivery model.

The construction-manager-at-risk method brings in a contractor to consult at the design phase. In a design-build-delivery model, the design and construction services are contracted by a single entity known as the design-builder or design-build contractor.

The ordinance also amends the standards so that formal competitive bidding will not normally be required for purchases of less than $50,000. The previous threshold was $25,000.