A traffic advisory group has been formed to conduct a review of traffic volume and speed on Grandview Heights roads.

A traffic advisory group has been formed to conduct a review of traffic volume and speed on Grandview Heights roads.

The 12-member group includes a mix of city officials and residents as well as traffic consultant Jason Sudy with Side Street Planning, Mayor Ray DeGraw said.

The mayor said he decided to form the group after a series of public meetings during which residents expressed concern about traffic issues, especially with the addition over the next few years of about 3,000 Nationwide Insurance employees who will move into the company's new corporate center under construction at Grandview Yard.

The advisory group will collect and review data regarding traffic volume and speed to serve as a baseline for future comparison, DeGraw said.

The city will place devices on streets throughout the city that will measure how many vehicles are traveling along a road and how fast they are going, he said.

All streets in the city will be reviewed, DeGraw said.

The data will provide a baseline that can be used to help determine if traffic patterns are indeed changing due to the influx of new employees or for other reasons, he said.

"We want to make sure the perception (of increased traffic or vehicular speed) is a reality" before potential actions to address the problem are considered, DeGraw said.

"Some streets may be carrying more than their fair share of traffic volume," he said. "It is a question of what is real and what is not."

One concern some residents have raised is speeding on roads used as cut-through streets, he said.

"Cut-through streets and the areas around our schools are of particular concern for us," DeGraw said.

Another important issue is whether more can be done to maintain the safety of drivers, cyclists and pedestrians who share city streets, DeGraw said.

The advisory group also will consider whether to recommend changes in how the city considers and addresses traffic issues, he said.

"We will be gathering the data and looking at whether there are alternatives to our policies we might want to consider," DeGraw said.