The son of a civil engineer, Hering studied architecture at MIT and Beaux Arts in Paris. In 1901, he opened his own architectural practice in New York City.

The son of a civil engineer, Hering studied architecture at MIT and Beaux Arts in Paris. In 1901, he opened his own architectural practice in New York City.

Hering specialized in country and suburban homes and pioneered the residential use of reinforced concrete. He designed several noted homes, including the Sheldon Mansion in Marble Cliff, featured in last week's Moment in Time.

Hering was the author of many books, including "Concrete and Stucco Houses" (1912) and "Economy in Home Building" (1924). One of his published philosophies was that the architectural design benefited from a strong friendship with the client, which allowed the architect to realize the owner's vision.

The Sheldon Mansion was used in many publications as an example of this philosophy.

As Hering said in one such article, "Mr. Sheldon's residence is a good example of the success attained when the client is willing to 'make friends' with his architect.

This implies a more or less intimate relationship, calling for an exchange of confidences, and the development of mutual trust and respect." Hering is shown at the left of this photo. On the right are interior photos of the Sheldon Mansion, including the stairway entry at the top, and the den at the bottom.