A wide variety of disciplines -- from the visual and performing arts to in-depth academic research -- will join together Nov. 12-14 on the Ohio State University campus to focus on the invisible scars borne by men and women who have seen combat.

A wide variety of disciplines -- from the visual and performing arts to in-depth academic research -- will join together Nov. 12-14 on the Ohio State University campus to focus on the invisible scars borne by men and women who have seen combat.

"Responsibility, Morality and the Cost of War: PTSD, Moral Injury and Beyond" is the title of the symposium that will take place throughout the weekend at the Wexner Center for the Arts, Drake Center, Bowen Theatre and other venues. It will feature film screenings, panel discussions, art exhibits, stage performances and workshops, all centered on post-traumatic stress disorder.

The event is free and open to the public, although registration is required.

Clintonville residents Kevin McClatchy, an assistant professor in the OSU Department of Theatre, and Janet Parrott, associate professor in the department, are the symposium directors.

"What excites me about this symposium is the notion of bringing together different disciplines, different ideas, different perspectives and looking at issues ... " Parrott said. "I think bringing different ideas to the table, maybe it creates something new, maybe it brings to light some issues we all need to be thinking about in our lives and in our community."

"For lack of a better word, it's intentional collisions and encounters between people who wouldn't normally come together and who find themselves in the same room talking about this particular issue," McClatchy said.

The genesis for "Responsibility, Morality and the Cost of War" dates to 2012 when McClatchy was completing his master's degree in acting at Ohio State. Putting on a solo show is the final step in the process and McClatchy decided to write his own play.

"I knew that I wanted to do a solo show based on the experiences of a friend of mine who was in the military," he said.

Parrott, who was one of McClatchy's instructors at the time, said his play, Scrap Heap, helped her develop an interest in the issue of PTSD.

"I'm also just very interested as a documentary filmmaker in how people deal with complicated issues in their lives, and how they find themselves working through the world," she said. "I'm fascinated how different disciplines deal with issues of trauma, issues of just being human, issues of joy, issues of responsibility."

McClatchy will perform Scrap Heap, which he has expanded to a 45-minute play, at 8 p.m. Nov. 14 in the Bowen Theatre as part of the symposium.

The former Special Services soldier on whom the work is based has been a collaborator in the play from the beginning, McClatchy said.

"His response has been overwhelmingly favorable," the playwright added. "Whether or not he ever wants to actually sit through it is another matter. For him, I guess you would call it a warts-and-all construction of his experiences."

McClatchy, who joined the theater department's faculty in 2013, said he began discussing the idea of exploring PTSD through different disciplines with Parrott, now a colleague.

"We started speaking in earnest about the possibility and the need for a different kind of symposium approach to the morality of war and the challenges veterans face," he said.

A traditional symposium generally involves someone giving a talk on a subject, followed by questions and answers. "Responsibility, Morality and the Cost of War" will feature some of that, McClatchy said, but also will provide "myriad points of view and points of entry.

"Gathering the actual participants has been a delight," he added. "The timing of the symposium is both a blessing and a burden. It's a blessing because it's three days after Veterans Day, so there's awareness. It's a burden because it's three days after Veterans Day and a lot of the people we were interested in are very busy."