Grandview Heights officials are planning a low-key campaign for the renewal of the property-tax levy on the March 15 primary ballot.

Grandview Heights officials are planning a low-key campaign for the renewal of the property-tax levy on the March 15 primary ballot.

"The message is pretty clear: This is a renewal and the levy is necessary for us to continue to operate the same level of services for our residents," council President Anthony Panzera said.

"I don't expect a large campaign," he said. "We will concentrate on getting information about the levy out to our residents."

Council voted Monday, Dec. 7, to place a renewal of the city's four-year, 7.5-mill property tax levy on the ballot.

"We've had great support from our residents with our past levies," Mayor Ray DeGraw said. "In a few years, we may be able to (re-evaluate) the property-tax levy, but right now, we need this. We're heavily dependent on the property-tax levy.

"The nice thing is renewing the levy will not mean an increase in taxes for our residents," he said.

About 17.4 percent of the city's revenue comes from the property tax, Finance Director Bob Dvoraczky said.

If approved by voters, the renewal of the levy would continue to generate about $1.8 million annually, but because of increased property values in the city, the effective rate of the levy would be lower than 7.5 mills, he said.

The measure would cost homeowners $241 annually for each $100,000 of property valuation.

It would cost $708 annually for the owner of a $294,254 home -- the average market value of homes in Grandview.

Also at its Dec. 7 meeting, council approved a $17,333,825 budget for 2016.

The budget includes a general fund of $11.6 million, an increase of about 6.8 percent over the initial 2015 budget approved by council.