The Grandview Avenue Farmers Market has many regular customers, but most of them don't get behind the wheel to patronize the eight to 10 vendors who participate in each week's event.

The Grandview Avenue Farmers Market has many regular customers, but most of them don't get behind the wheel to patronize the eight to 10 vendors who participate in each week's event.

"We love our Grandview Avenue location," market Manager Marcy Musson said. "I bet 80 percent of our customers walk here. There's so much activity on a Saturday."

The market is open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Saturday in the parking lot at 1371-91 Grandview Ave.

Stephanie and Marc Fulton, owners of Falcon and Flash Spice Co., began selling their products at markets in June.

"We're introducing our products to the community. It's sort of market research -- or farmers market research," Marc Fulton said.

"Right now, we're just selling at markets, but our goal is to branch out into e-commerce later this year and hopefully someday get our spices into stores," Stephanie Fulton said.

The Clintonville couple have participated in the Westgate and Grove City farmers markets as well as in Grandview.

Falcon and Flash features unique varieties and unusual spice blends created by the Fultons.

"What's great about a farmers market is that people can actually taste, see and smell our spices before they buy them," Marc Fulton said. "You go to a store and one brand of spice is 99 cents and another is $6 and you really don't know what you're getting in either case."

Logan Meyer, who owns Impossible Jams with his wife, Erika Prizzi, said he also enjoys having people taste the distinctive jams and jellies they produce out of their kitchen.

"I love getting that look of surprise" as customers sample such flavors as peach bourbon, strawberry sriracha and blueberry gin, he said.

"They're not your typical store-bought jams and jellies," Prizzi said.

The process of developing new recipes "involves a kind of alchemy," Meyer said. "There's some trial and error. We have a drawer of recipes that didn't quite work out. It's fun to experiment."

Although they now live in the Westgate neighborhood, the couple used to call Grandview home.

"We love being part of the Grandview market because it keeps us connected to the community," Prizzi said. "Marc grew up in Grandview, so it's coming home for him."

For Taylor Runge, co-owner of Owls Knot Roastery, the goal is to allow people to enjoy world-class coffee anywhere -- whether it's at home, the office or on a camping trip.

"Most of us don't have the time to spend hanging out in coffee shops and trying all the different varieties of coffee," he said.

He and his girlfriend, Leigh Ann Edmondson, love coffee and started experimenting with roasting coffee using beans from such places as South America, Africa, Central America and Southeast Asia.

"We use a small roaster, so we're making small batches of our coffee," Runge said. "It's quality coffee you can't find in a brick-and-mortar store."

The Grandview Avenue Farmers Market will run through Oct. 29.

Upcoming special market days will include farmers Sample Day Saturday, Aug. 13, in which each vendor will offer customers free samples of their products, and Apple Day on Sept. 17, when each visitor will receive a free apple.

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