Grandview Heights City Council members this week approved a resolution to support the city's Bikeway Pilot Plan 2016, but action on giving its support to a proposed traffic plan was delayed at least until January.

Grandview Heights City Council members this week approved a resolution to support the city's Bikeway Pilot Plan 2016, but action on giving its support to a proposed traffic plan was delayed at least until January.

Council voted 6-1 in favor of the resolution during its Dec. 5 meeting -- its last scheduled gathering of the year.

Councilman Steve Reynolds cast the only vote against the resolution, expressing his concern that the bike plan recommends removing the speed bumps on Broadview Avenue between First and Third avenues without providing an alternative method of calming traffic.

The plan recommends removing the speed bumps because they hinder cyclists' travel on the street.

Broadview Avenue residents attended council meetings in August to express their concerns that the speed bumps would be removed when the city repaves the road next year. Residents presented a petition signed by Broadview homeowners asking that the bumps be replaced after repaving.

Although Reynolds said he favors almost all of what's in the bikeway plan, "my difficulty is there still isn't a hard and fast solution for an alternative (to the bumps)."

If the bike plan were the only item before council, he could vote for it, Reynolds said -- but the traffic plan also has been presented, and it does not include speed bumps as a recommended tool the city can use as a traffic-calming measure.

Broadview residents "came out en masse to express their concerns," he said, and if the bike plan "takes away what they feel is the best solution, we're doing substantial damage."

Council President Greta Kearns said the resolution had been revised to state that City Council would support the bikeway plan, not adopt it, and that the plan should be viewed as a tool in crafting future policies, not as a set of rules to be followed verbatim.

"The purpose of the bike plan is to support multimodal transit across the city," Councilwoman Emily Keeler said.

If cyclists want to travel on Broadview, "they should be able to do it safely," she said. "It's not that the speed bumps would never go back in, but that whatever would be done would be bike-friendly."

The bike plan proposes more than five miles of new bicycle paths.

Those proposals include extending a bike path along Goodale Boulevard to Olentangy River Road; extending the eastbound bike lane on Goodale to Grandview Avenue; and stretching the multiuse paths from Wyman Woods Park to C. Ray Buck Sports Park and from Buck Park/Palmer Road to Northwest Boulevard.

Several roadways would be designated as bicycle boulevards, or residential streets with low speeds and traffic volume designed to give priority to cyclists.

Proposed bicycle boulevards would include a route traveling from Avondale and Second avenues south and east using Avondale, Bluff Avenue, Woodhill Drive and Burr Avenue, ending at Burr and Yard Street; Oxley Road from Goodale Boulevard to Third Avenue; Second Avenue from Edgehill Drive to Grandview Avenue; Broadview Avenue from Goodale to Third Avenue; and Lincoln Road from Bluff to First Avenue.

Council voted to table its consideration of the traffic plan until its January meeting.

The plan includes a tool kit of potential actions the city could take to address various traffic issues. It also presents a proposed traffic-calming request process and a set of criteria that would be used to review any issue raised by a resident.

"If people have an issue on their street, they can come in -- any person, any street -- and get treated the same," Keeler said. "Everybody will know what will happen and there will be more transparency."

Like the bikeway-plan resolution, the proposed traffic-plan legislation has been amended to reflect council's support and that the plan offers guidelines and prescribed rules.

Councilman Steve Papineau questioned whether speed bumps could be added to the plan's tool kit since it is only a guide for future policies.

That way, the plan would not be held up over one issue, he said.

Also this week, council approved a $20.1 million city budget for 2017. The general-fund budget is about $12.5 million for the year.

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