Incentives for a pharmaceutical packaging company to locate in Hilliard and the city's budget presentation were focal points in committee meetings Nov. 22.

Incentives for a pharmaceutical packaging company to locate in Hilliard and the city's budget presentation were focal points in committee meetings Nov. 22.

An ordinance providing economic development incentives for GenPak Solutions LLC was forwarded to council with a positive recommendation. The startup company, at 4324 Reynolds Drive, is expected to employ 59 people by the end of 2013.

"The company makes blister packaging for pharmaceuticals," Hilliard Mayor Don Schonhardt told council members. "The prospects for that particular industry are very good over the next 5-10 years. We anticipate the company doing well here in the community."

GenPak would be offered a refundable jobs creation tax credit against net profit taxes paid to the city. "This piece of legislation is consistent with the incentive agreements we've offered to date," Schonhardt said.

Earlier in the afternoon, director of finance Michelle Kelly Underwood told council of her department's accomplishments for the year. Underwood said accounting software originally installed in 1996 was upgraded. Her department collected over $110,000 in delinquent taxes and received a clean 2009 financial audit.

"I expect nothing less from us," Underwood said. "We find that we spend most of our time either preparing for the audit, talking to auditors, thinking about the audit, doing the audit. It is a year-long process."

In addition, the department received the certificate of achievement for excellence in financial reporting and received an Aa2 credit rating (the third-highest) from Moody's Investors Service on the city's long-term outstanding debt.

The department's 2011 goals include moving to paperless processing for purchase orders, vendor checks and payroll and implementing Governmental Accounting Standards Board fund balance classifications.

Underwood also reviewed the year in information technology, which saw a doubling of Internet bandwidth, installation of citywide daily automated data backup, an anti-virus solution and uninterrupted power supply for City Hall.

"Everything we do is touched by IT," Underwood said, noting that in the past, whenever it rained or someone cut a power line, their servers would crash and employees had nothing to do. Now, there are fewer crashes, she said.