Renovations to the Hilliard police and Norwich administrative sections of the Joint Safety Services Building, 5181 Northwest Parkway, could be postponed until next year.

Renovations to the Hilliard police and Norwich administrative sections of the Joint Safety Services Building, 5181 Northwest Parkway, could be postponed until next year.

Thomas Linzell, senior project manager for M&A Architects, told the Norwich Township trustees June 2 that all five bids received exceeded the architect's estimate for the project.

The lowest was from Palmetto Construction Services for $446,077, about 6.6 percent higher than the estimate of $418,544, according to Linzell.

The township and the city would share the cost of the renovation project but many of the modifications would be for the Hilliard Division of Police, including the creation of more office space, according to local officials.

Acting police Chief Bobby Fisher told trustees he had discussed the bids with city administrators, who considered the amount "substantially higher" than authorized by pending legislation.

"We would have to reduce the scope or (do it in phases) to move on it now," Fisher said.

Trustee Chuck Buck was critical of the city's tardiness in soliciting bids and asked if the city could cover the difference.

He said the bids were higher because they were not sought earlier in the year.

"We need to step back and reassess this," Trustee Tim Roberts said.

Linzell said June 2 it was unknown if Palmetto Construction Services would modify the scope of the project in order to lower the cost or if the project would be rebid.

Linzell and the trustees concurred if the project must be rebid, it would be pushed back to next year.

Linzell said he would report back at the next meeting, scheduled for 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 16.

In other business June 2, Fisher reported to trustees concerning the speed of motorists on sections of Schirtzinger Road and Darbyshire Drive.

Fisher called speeding in the Ridgewood subdivision a "perception" issue, pointing out that a recent three-day measurement of speeds on the streets indicated about 85 percent of the vehicles traveled at or below the posted limit.

At the request of Norwich Township trustees and in response to appeals from residents, Hilliard police used a stealth radar unit to record speeds on Schirtzinger Road west of Astral Drive and on Darbyshire Drive east of Astral Drive.

The speed limit on the measured section of Schirtzinger Road is 35 mph; the limit on Darbyshire Drive is 25 mph. Speeds were recorded May 19 through May 21.

The maximum speed recorded on Schirtzinger Road was 50 mph by a westbound motorist May 19.

The report showed that of the 8,237 vehicles recorded on Schirtzinger Road in the three-day period, 5,800 were westbound, an anomaly the trustees attributed to drivers circumventing school zones.

On Darbyshire Drive, 1,351 vehicles were recorded. Only two vehicles were reported at more than 40 mph, or 15 mph above the speed limit.

One was at 41 mph and the other at 92 mph. The latter was a westbound car recorded at 7:30 p.m. May 21.

Fisher said while it could not be proven, he believes the recorded speed of 92 mph was a radar malfunction.

Fisher said based on the findings, he did not consider excessive speeding to be a problem in the subdivision.