Raspberry thumbprint, molasses, macaroons, gingersnap, shortbread and oatmeal chocolate chip were among the 20-plus varieties of cookies offered by Johnstown's Angels and Astronauts Child Conservation League (CCL) last weekend.

Raspberry thumbprint, molasses, macaroons, gingersnap, shortbread and oatmeal chocolate chip were among the 20-plus varieties of cookies offered by Johnstown's Angels and Astronauts Child Conservation League (CCL) last weekend.

Entering the basement of Johnstown's United Methodist Church Nov. 21, visitors saw tray after tray of thousands of cookies and candies, all homemade by the club's 15 members.

"Each girl is responsible for making 20 to 25 dozen cookies," said Fay Shaub, 85, who's an original member of the 50-year-old club.

The group started what's known as the "cookie walk" 14 years ago as a fundraiser.

"We needed money and someone in the group suggested a cookie walk," Shaub said. "This is our biggest fundraiser. We usually clear $1,000."

Patrons attending the walk are asked to wear plastic gloves for cleanliness as they select from trays of labeled goodies. In addition to every kind of cookie imaginable, there are various homemade candies including the popular chocolate and peanut butter Buckeye candies, peanut brittle, pretzels dipped in chocolate and fudge.

Johnstown's Nancy Dyer has attended the Cookie Walk for years.

"The cookies I buy here usually don't last until the holidays," she said. "Most of the time, they're gone in days unless I hide them."

The money raised from the walk is used to help local children, said CCL member Netia Mills.

"We've donated to the band and purchased a basketball hoop for the JYAA (Johnstown Youth Athletic Association)," she said. "We also purchased a community board for the library and computer software for the high school."

The local CCL membership fluctuates between 15 and 20 members and is one of the larger chapters, according to Mills.

The CCL also supports Adopt-a-Family at Christmas and sponsors the Santa House in Bigelow Park, Johnstown Christmas Parade and Letters to Santa at the special mailbox at Shull's Hardware.

With the current recession, Shaub worried how it would affect the cookie sale. Not much, it turned out: a steady stream of customers patronized the walk last Saturday.

"We open at 9 a.m. and we're usually out by 11 a.m.," Shaub said. "The peanut butter kiss cookies and decorated cutouts are the most popular. Those are the two we have to have a lot of. The Buckeye candies also run out quickly."

Any leftover cookies are donated to the Johnstown Northridge Food Pantry. The group charges $7 a pound to make it a viable project for the club, according to Shaub.

"We have regular supporters including Cletus and Shirley Beam, who are among the 'best customers,'" she said. "We had someone order 20 pounds. The girls make them right before the walk so they're fresh."