Apeks Supercritical, a multimillion-dollar manufacturing company, took the first step toward moving out of its founder's backyard Nov. 25 when owner and president Andy Joseph broke ground on a new facility in Johnstown's industrial park.

Apeks Supercritical, a multimillion-dollar manufacturing company, took the first step toward moving out of its founder's backyard Nov. 25 when owner and president Andy Joseph broke ground on a new facility in Johnstown's industrial park.

A pole barn in Joseph's yard no longer can handle the company's needs, but a 65,000-square-foot facility at 150 Commerce Blvd. should do the trick.

"It's going to allow us to increase our production capacity in several ways," Joseph said. "Obviously, we'll have more space to make stuff, but the bigger impact in the short term will be space for managing inventory. So it's going to free us up."

Apeks has existed since 2001, when Joseph began manufacturing machines that extract botanical oils. The process initially was used for products such as lavender or vanilla.

But since marijuana legalization has gained steam in the western U.S., so has business for the Johnstown-based company.

According to Joseph, Apeks made about $750,000 in 2012 and more than $3.2 million in 2013. He initially expected revenue to reach $8 million this year, but now expects it to be more than $9 million.

With the new facility, Joseph said he expects to bring in between $20 million and $30 million in 2015.

And in his business, those funds mean better products.

"(The increased revenue) will allow us to reinvest in ourselves," Joseph said. "That's been the key to the business from the beginning. There are so many things we can do to continue the technology we develop, and all of that requires more money and more investment."

The new manufacturing facility, estimated to cost $1.6 million, will come together in two phases on the eight-acre plot of land.

The first phase is a 17,000-square-foot project that includes 5,000 square feet of office space and another 12,000 for manufacturing that should be complete by April 2015, when Joseph plans to move the company to its new location.

The second phase, an added 48,000 square feet of manufacturing space, is planned to begin in spring 2016. With that much extra room, Joseph said the company will be able to have space dedicated to research and development.

More jobs also will come with the new space.

Apeks employs about 15 workers now, and will add another 15 within the next year, increasing that number as the company increases its space.

Apeks' arrival in the industrial park nearly fills the space, and for Johnstown Village Manager Jim Lenner, the company's move is a sign of an upswing in jobs in the village and an indication that another industrial park could be necessary.

"For the village, I think (Apeks' new facility) is going to be a pretty good impact," Lenner said. "That's 15 jobs coming into the village ... and we strive to get people to live and work here in community, so the quality-of-life impact will be good for people, especially after they start adding more jobs."

With the high-profile building comes a more high-profile outlook for the future.

Joseph said cable channel CNBC had cameras at the groundbreaking and in Johnstown to shoot footage for a special that will feature Apeks, and Joseph said he's perfectly fine with being a face of the marijuana movement in Ohio -- though his company never deals with the drug and he makes it a point not to be called an activist.

Instead, he prefers to educate people about the business that states without legalization of the drug are missing.

"It's one of those things that people need to realize," he said. "Just because it's illegal doesn't mean it's not here. It's here illegally; it's here underground; it's here with cartels. Our tax dollars are basically going to fight it and to arrest people for it ... and the states around us are getting our tax dollars."

But Joseph isn't letting the success go to his head, and despite moving out of his own property for the first time, the growth of his company still hasn't hit him yet.

"Maybe at some point in time, it will," he said. "I don't know if I'm not sentimental or if I just don't have time. The reality is that I'm probably a little superstitious. I'm the type of guy who, if I take a moment to step back and look at what I've done, I think that's the first step to failure."