Fifteen years ago on Sept. 11, more than a dozen terrorists, using four jetliners, killed nearly 3,000 people, including many firefighters and law enforcement personnel who rushed into the World Trade Center to bring others to safety.

Fifteen years ago on Sept. 11, more than a dozen terrorists, using four jetliners, killed nearly 3,000 people, including many firefighters and law enforcement personnel who rushed into the World Trade Center to bring others to safety.

Whereas time has lessened the impact for some, the anniversary of the Sept. 11 attack is an important one for first-responders who will never forget the sacrifices of their brothers and sisters.

Marysville will hold its remembrance ceremony at 9:50 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 11, at the Marysville Division of Fire, station at 16300 County Home Road. It is open to the public.

"Each of us feel a part of us was lost that day," Battalion Chief Mark Ropp said.

"Firefighters share an immense brotherhood, and when one is lost, we all share that loss.

"Police officers speak of the thin blue line; firefighters think of the thin red line."

The ceremony will honor the 343 fighters who died that day with the ringing of bells. Before computers, firefighters communicated with firehouses using a series of rings and gave the location of a fire by a code assigned to the nearest intersection.

The 5-5-5-5 code signals a death.

"It is very meaningful to us," Ropp said.

He said he remembers watching the events unfold that day and couldn't help but think what he would do if he were in that situation.

"Saving lives and fixing the emergency was the mission," Rapp said.

"Marysville firefighters, and firefighters all over the country have the same mission every day.

"It's certainly not on the scale of the World Trade Center terrorist attack," he said, "but the mission is the same none the less."

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