The Rocky Fork-Blacklick Accord Implementation Panel decided April 21 to delay until May its review of plans for a storage facility on Johnstown Road, north of the water tower in Plain Township.

The Rocky Fork-Blacklick Accord Implementation Panel decided April 21 to delay until May its review of plans for a storage facility on Johnstown Road, north of the water tower in Plain Township.

"The accord (panel) decided to continue the application for 10913 Johnstown Road, at the request of applicant, to review some issues," said Plain Township administrator Ben Collins.

The panel was set to review an application that requested a change in zoning from rural to select planned-commercial district. But, Collins said, eight to 10 area residents attended the meeting to talk about the application.

Don Durbin of AAA Storage, who is planning to build the storage facility, said he did not have any plans to put on the projector and show neighbors what the project would look like.

"A lot of people didn't understand what we're trying to do," Durbin said.

Without an "overhead" display, he said, "I couldn't show everybody what we want to do."

Collins said AAA Storage would like to build a set of storage units that will total 102,420 square feet. The facility will be set more than 400 feet west of Johnstown Road, with residential uses on either side. He said the building would include some units on the west end that will provide indoor, climate-controlled storage for recreational vehicles.

Because there are no similar uses in the area, Collins said, when comparing the project to accord standards, he used the office/warehouse standards.

An abandoned house built in 1972 currently sits on the 10.788-acre lot. Collins described the home as "dilapidated" and said the home and the ditch in front of the property need attention.

Durbin said his plan has a nice setback and a lot of green space in front of the building. He said it meets township standards.

Collins said a select commercial-planned district allows general commercial uses. It allows developers to create their own development standards.

The Plain Township Zoning Commission is expected to hear the same zoning request Thursday, April 28.

The Rocky Fork-Blacklick Accord implementation panel was established after New Albany, Columbus and Plain Township decided to use the Rocky Fork-Blacklick Accord as "a multijurisdictional land-use and development policy guide covering portions of Columbus, New Albany and Plain Township," according to the city of Columbus' website. The panel reviews zoning applications "for compliance with the accord plan and provides a non-binding recommendation to the community with jurisdiction over the case," according to the website.