Superintendent April Domine said New Albany-Plain Local officials were disappointed with the results of Ohio's two-year state budget approved June 30.

Superintendent April Domine said New Albany-Plain Local officials were disappointed with the results of Ohio's two-year state budget approved June 30.

The district received a small increase in state funding over the next two years.

"We are grateful for the small increase but (state funding for public schools) still did not go to the support level for New Albany's children that it needed to go to," she said.

Treasurer Rebecca Jenkins said previous versions of the budget would have provided the district with more revenue than the current version.

The current version – which changed June 30 after Gov. John Kasich vetoed two provisions – removed $99 million in funding for what are considered "wealthy" school districts.

Jenkins said the district will receive an increase of 10.4 percent, or $297,937, in fiscal 2016 and an increase of 7.3 percent, or $233,317, in fiscal 2017.

"This is still an increase over the 1.5 percent we had in the (five-year) forecast but certainly not what we were hoping for," Jenkins said in an email.

Domine said many people were working to convince state legislators that children in public districts should receive the same amount of state funding as children in private schools.

"We've championed the cause that our children deserve the same level of support," Domine said. "Even at the end of this two-year budget cycle, we will still be budgeted far lower than what private schools receive."

Kasich's vetoes also removed the second-year reimbursement to school districts for revenue lost through the state's elimination of the tangible personal-property tax.

Jenkins said that veto would not affect New Albany-Plain Local.

"We are not impacted by the tangible personal-property tax reimbursement, as we haven't received it since 2012," Jenkins said.

The budget bill, Ohio House Bill 64, also eliminated funding for the state's Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers tests.

Domine said the state already uses the American Institute for Research platform when testing students in social studies and science. She said the state has a long history of working with AIR and it will be "an improvement" to use the AIR platform for math and language-arts testing.

Domine recently served on the Ohio Senate's state-testing advisory committee, which determined the state standardized testing needed to be shorter, administered only once a school year, better aligned with state standards and on one online platform, she said.

She said the AIR testing will provide those four changes.